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6 minutes ago, Army Guy said:

The US army is committed to the new weapons, and like any major new equipment role out it will be done in phases much like when we adapted the 5.56... a slow role out with a slow training cycle...eventual the entire army will have this , i can't see how it could not, the logistics would be very difficult.... this program has been on going since the M-16 was rolled out in Vietnam, with the most common issue with 5.56 was penetration and knock down power and range ...

I witnessed this many times in Afghanistan, 5.56 just lacked the knock down power... yes you can carry more rounds but it takes 3 or more to take a bad guy down and keep him down, some times requiring more than two or three double taps unless you hit bone then the exit wound would be cause severe trauma ,or hit a vital organ.   now hit him 7.62...one round was often enough even with a plate you'd need to be super man to get right back up.

This program is going to take years to role out, build up 6.8 stocks, and deplete the massive 5.56...stocks...

 

6.8x51mm is indeed designed for Afghanistan

but now that the war is back in Central Europe & Mechanized

the reason for adopting the 5.56x45mm in the first place has come back into style

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Military officer AWOL from Ukraine mission returns to Canada; DND confirms he has been released from the Canadian Forces

The Canadian Army leadership decided not to charge the officer with any offence.

Published Aug 21, 2023  •  Last updated 47 minutes ago  •  3 minute read

 

Troops from 3rd Canadian Division ship out for the UkraineTroops from 3rd Canadian Division ship out for the Ukraine as part of Operation Unifier in 2017. Photo by Bloom, David /Postmedia

A Canadian soldier training Ukrainian troops disappeared for at least six months before resurfacing back home and has now been released from the military, according to documents obtained by this newspaper.

Despite the captain admitting he had gone absent without leave, Canadian Army commanders have decided not to lay charges.

The officer, originally from a Toronto-based military unit, had been in Ukraine as part of a Canadian Forces training mission there and had been transferred to Poland for a return to Canada in February 2022.

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But the soldier told his commanders that, since he and his wife had family in Ukraine, he wasn’t going to follow orders to return and would instead stay in Poland to help relatives.

“Member has disobeyed a lawful command and is AWOL from his parent unit,” concluded one report obtained through the Access to Information law.

The officer had a specialized passport issued to people holding office, such as members of Parliament and people employed by the Canadian government in non-diplomatic capacities travelling on official missions or to posts abroad. In addition, he had his Canadian Forces uniform and some equipment.

National Defence spokeswoman Jessica Lamirande confirmed Thursday that the officer later returned to Canada and was released from the military. The Canadian Army leadership decided not to charge the officer with any offence.

Lamirande said the identity of the soldier cannot be released because of federal privacy law. The specific date the soldier returned to Canada was not provided, although the military said it was last fall.

Lamirande said the soldier “was subject to release” from the Canadian Forces, but, due to privacy laws, she could not provide any other information about that process.

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“As the former member is now a civilian, we have no knowledge of their current whereabouts,” she added.

The records released to this newspaper noted that, shortly after the Russian invasion of Ukraine in February 2022, the officer asked his commanding officer if he could release from his Canadian Forces duties in Poland so he could help family members in Ukraine to cross the border.

That request was denied and he was ordered to return to his home unit, The Governor General’s Horse Guards in Toronto, where, after a short period, he could then go on leave.

But the soldier never got on the return flight or showed up at his Toronto unit, with military police brought in to search for him, the Canadian Forces records showed.

At one point, the soldier phoned the commanding officer of his home unit and said he was in Krakow, Poland. He “expressed that he has no intention of leaving Poland or re-entering Ukraine,” that report noted. “Mbr (member) understands that he is AWOL.”

The soldier was part of Operation UNIFIER, the Canadian military training mission in support of the Armed Forces of Ukraine. It was launched in 2015 and training took place in Ukraine until the Russian invasion in 2022. Now the training of Ukrainian troops is conducted in the United Kingdom, Poland and Latvia.

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Other documents also show a concern among Canadian military leaders that the news media might find out about former or still-serving Canadian Forces members who have either gone to fight in Ukraine or have travelled to that country during the war.

Chief of the Defence Staff Gen. Wayne Eyre issued a directive on March 24, 2022, prohibiting military personnel from travelling to Ukraine, Belarus or Russia unless it was for military-approved business.

The documents also detail other issues with the training mission in Ukraine, including the theft of military equipment. Around $100,000 worth of helmets, bulletproof vests and computer hard drives were reported stolen in a report on Dec. 15, 2021. A U.S. military training contingent also had equipment stolen, the documents added.

Most of the equipment was eventually recovered, and most of the hard drives had been previously wiped clean. But the report noted that, among the stolen items, there were also computer servers from the Canadian training mission to Ukraine in 2019. Although an investigation determined that no classified material had been compromised, it concluded that the personal information of some Canadian soldiers who previously served in Ukraine “may be compromised.”

https://ottawacitizen.com/news/national/defence-watch/military-officer-awol-from-ukraine-mission-returns-to-canada-dnd-confirms-he-has-been-released-from-the-canadian-forces

 

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Josh Dehaas: Military committee leads the way on declaring vaccine mandates unconstitutional

Forcing military personnel to choose between keeping their jobs and their rights was not a meaningful choice

Josh Dehaas,  Special to National Post
Published Aug 23, 2023 
 
maxresdefault.jpg
Dallas Alexander, JTF2 Sniper forced out for declining to take the Covid-19 vaccine
 
In January 2021, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau ruled out COVID-19 vaccine mandates. In March, he shot down the idea again. In May, he dug in, saying, “We’re not a country that makes vaccination mandatory.” But in August of that year, Trudeau made a U-turn, announcing mandatory vaccinations for public servants and anyone boarding planes and trains. Then he called a snap election.
 
Now, the Military Grievances External Review Committee, which was tasked with reviewing the cases of Canadian Forces members who were kicked out of the military for refusing to get vaccinated, has called out the claim that no one was ever forced to get vaccinated. While service members “theoretically” retained a choice, “the consequences of a refusal are such that this choice is not really a choice,” wrote committee member Nina Frid in her review.
 
Citing Judge Mark Phillips of the Quebec Superior Court in the 2022 case Syndicat des métallos, Frid explained that policies that force people to choose between staying unvaccinated and keeping their jobs engage the charter-protected rights to liberty — which includes the right to direct one’s own medical care — and security of the person, which protects bodily integrity. Not only were these rights engaged, Frid found the policy was unconstitutional.
 
Frid recognized, as Bedford requires, that forcing military personnel to choose between keeping their jobs and their rights was also not a meaningful choice, and so their rights were violated. She also decided that the policy could not be upheld as a demonstrably justified limit under Section 1 of the charter because, among other reasons, the government could have achieved its goals while accommodating the small minority of soldiers who insisted on their charter rights by offering them remote work, testing or leaves of absences.
 
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RCAF to participate for the first time in multinational exercise in U.K.

Department of National Defence Press Release | August 29, 2023

Estimated reading time 4 minutes, 42 seconds. 

Screen-Shot-2022-04-19-at-8.53.04-AM-102 The RCAF’s participation in Ex COBRA WARRIOR 23-2 includes seven CF-188 Hornets from 433 Tactical Fighter Squadron. Pvt Eric Chaput Photo

Aircraft and personnel from the Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) will participate for the first time in Exercise COBRA WARRIOR 23-2, a Royal Air Force (RAF) hosted multinational live-fly exercise held at RAF station Waddington in the United Kingdom, from Sept. 4 to 22, 2023.

The RCAF’s participation in Ex COBRA WARRIOR 23-2 includes seven CF-188 Hornets from 433 Tactical Fighter Squadron, one CC-150T Polaris from 437 Transport Squadron and more than 140 RCAF personnel.

Exercise COBRA WARRIOR provides an invaluable opportunity for international allies and partners to train together in developing operational tactics in the air. Australia, as well as Canada’s NATO allies the United Kingdom, the United States, and Italy, will be participating in this multinational exercise.

The exercise will further develop the RCAF’s abilities to operate in high intensity, large force, tactical air war-fighting operations, while enhancing its proven capability to operate in European airspace.

“Ensuring the readiness of the Royal Canadian Air Force to counter air threats is one of our most important responsibilities,” said Lieutenant-General Eric Kenny, commander of the Royal Canadian Air Force.

“Exercises like COBRA WARRIOR provide highly valuable training not only for our members, but also those of our allies and partners, to practice working together in a wide variety of tactical combat scenarios that they could face on real world operations.” 

“Recognizing the current world security environment, this training is of particular importance for the Royal Canadian Air Force as we strive to safeguard North American airspace,” said Major-General Iain Huddleston, commander of 1 Canadian Air Division.

“Exercise COBRA WARRIOR will strengthen the interoperability between the participants and build on strong relationships with participating allied and partner-nation Air Forces.”

Quick Facts

  • The RCAF will be taking part in developing interoperability with allies and partners by exercising composite air operations in a contested, degraded and operationally limited environment.
  • The Royal Canadian Air Force aircraft will be operating from Royal Air Force Station Waddington and Royal Air Force Station Lossiemouth.
  • Four RCAF air battle managers will be taking part in the exercise from RAF Boulmer. RCAF Air battle managers will provide command and control capabilities to enable simulated air combat.
  • Exercise COBRA WARRIOR is the largest exercise organized by the Royal Air Force and is a biannual training exercise to provide participants with high intensity large force tactical training.
  • Exercise COBRA WARRIOR brings different partner nation platforms together, providing crews an opportunity to learn how to integrate and enhance interoperability. Participating nations also fulfill leadership roles and are involved in mission planning.

This press release was prepared and distributed by Canada’s Department of National Defence.
 

https://skiesmag.com/press-releases/rcaf-to-participate-for-the-first-time-in-multinational-exercise-in-uk/?utm_source=skies-daily-news-todays-news&utm_campaign=skies-daily-news&utm_medium=email&utm_term=todays-news&utm_content=V1

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Canadian Army surveillance vehicle project costing $533 million years behind schedule and facing 'multiple deficiencies'

The LRSS project is replacing the army’s existing fleet of 141 Coyote surveillance vehicles.

Published Aug 31, 2023  •  Last updated 7 hours ago  •  3 minute read

 

Light armoured vehicle LAV 6Canadian Armed Forces soldiers manoeuvre a LAV 6 Infantry Fighting Vehicle in Latvia in 2021. The contract for the Light Armoured Vehicle Reconnaissance Surveillance System project to provide 66 upgraded LAV with a new reconnaissance and surveillance system was awarded in 2014 and delivery of the vehicles was supposed to begin two years later. Photo by BG Juan Garnacho /Handout

A $533-million project to provide a high-tech surveillance and reconnaissance armoured vehicle to the Canadian Army is years behind schedule and plagued with multiple deficiencies, according to documents obtained by this newspaper.

The first of the new vehicles was supposed to be delivered by December 2016.

On Wednesday, though, National Defence announced that the first five ordered under the Light Armoured Vehicle Reconnaissance Surveillance System (LRSS) project were just now being transported to a Quebec military base in Quebec. They are expected to be delivered to the Canadian Army for testing sometime this fall.

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It will take until the summer of 2025 before all of the new vehicles are operational, National Defence noted in a statement to this newspaper.

But more problems could be on the horizon for the project.

Canadian Army officers briefed industry officials at an April 3 meeting in Ottawa that the LRSS project was facing “high technical risk.”

“Multiple deficiencies remain unaddressed and unquantified,” noted the presentation obtained by this newspaper.

The Conservative government originally announced in November 2014 that it had awarded a contract to General Dynamics Land Systems Canada in London, Ont., to provide the 66 upgraded Light Armoured Vehicles with a new reconnaissance and surveillance system.

Delivery of the vehicles was supposed to begin two years later, the federal government said at the time.

The LRSS project is replacing the army’s existing fleet of 141 Coyote surveillance vehicles. National Defence says the new equipment is composed of “state-of-the-art surveillance systems integrated onto the Light Armoured Vehicle 6.0 platform.”

That will provide a “digital surveillance system that pushes the technology envelope in terms of detection, recognition, and identification.”

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In a statement to this newspaper, National Defence spokesperson Jessica Lamirande noted, “As with any project, timelines can change as things evolve.”

Delays in the project are mainly attributable to software design and qualification testing issues, she added. “Technical challenges in software design and emergent issues during qualification testing needed to be worked and resolved.”

In addition, National Defence blamed COVID-19 pandemic-related supply-chain issues for some of the delays.

The LRSS project was a sole source contract to General Dynamics Land Systems Canada.

The company declined to comment, referring questions to National Defence.

In the April briefing to industry officials, army officers pointed out other ongoing issues with the LRSS project including that the contract was scheduled to end in 2025 despite the technical problems with the new vehicles. In addition, army officers noted that the existing Coyote fleet can’t be technically supported beyond 2025.

The need for the LRSS was identified by the military in 2009, according to Canadian Army records obtained by this newspaper. The original plan was to have the vehicles operating by 2012, but that never happened and the delays have piled up.

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In 2019, before the pandemic, Canadian Army officers were warning that the first vehicles wouldn’t be operational until 2020. That date also came and went.

Under the latest schedule, the first five of the new vehicles earmarked for testing are being transported by semi-trailer flatbed from London to Valcartier in Quebec. They will undergo testing until the winter of 2024, National Defence said.

Over the next 18 months, the remaining vehicles will be delivered in a similar manner to Canadian Forces Bases in Gagetown, N.B., Petawawa, Ont., Valcartier and Montréal.

The LRSS vehicles are outfitted with sensor suites consisting of digital, high definition electro-optic sensors, lasers and inertial navigation, as well as a new ground surveillance radar. This will permit the collection and sharing of real-time imagery on the battlefield, according to National Defence. The system is also supposed to provide long-range day and night surveillance capability under all-weather conditions.

 

https://ottawacitizen.com/news/national/defence-watch/canadian-army-surveillance-vehicle-project-costing-533-million-years-behind-schedule-and-facing-multiple-deficiencies

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CFB Trenton commander temporarily removed from post following firearms charges 

Colonel Leif Dahl was arrested by OPP following a complaint that a firearm was being discharged from a boat and wildlife was being targeted
 

….Colonel Leif Dahl, 45, was arrested earlier this month following a complaint that a firearm was being discharged from a boat in the Murray Canal, an eight-kilometre-long channel that flows into Lake Ontario.

It was reported to police that wildlife was being targeted from the boat. OPP later located the vessel and said that Dahl threw the firearm into the canal as police officers approached.

Dahl faces five charges, including careless use of a firearm, hunting birds without a licence, and unlawfully having a loaded firearm in a conveyance…..

https://www.coldlakesun.com/news/cfb-trenton-commander-firearms-charges

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7 minutes ago, BeaverFever said:

CFB Trenton commander temporarily removed from post following firearms charges 

Colonel Leif Dahl was arrested by OPP following a complaint that a firearm was being discharged from a boat and wildlife was being targeted
 

….Colonel Leif Dahl, 45, was arrested earlier this month following a complaint that a firearm was being discharged from a boat in the Murray Canal, an eight-kilometre-long channel that flows into Lake Ontario.

It was reported to police that wildlife was being targeted from the boat. OPP later located the vessel and said that Dahl threw the firearm into the canal as police officers approached.

Dahl faces five charges, including careless use of a firearm, hunting birds without a licence, and unlawfully having a loaded firearm in a conveyance…..

https://www.coldlakesun.com/news/cfb-trenton-commander-firearms-charges

That’s a Big Stupid for someone with such a Big Job. But not the worst guy to hold that position, considering one of his recent predecessors in that post was a serial killer. 

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14 minutes ago, BeaverFever said:

That’s a Big Stupid for someone with such a Big Job. But not the worst guy to hold that position, considering one of his recent predecessors in that post was a serial killer. 

It takes all kinds to make a village, and in this case you can't fix stupid...

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Canada takes delivery of first CC-330 Husky aircraft

By Skies Magazine | September 6, 2023

Estimated reading time 5 minutes, seconds. 

The first of nine CC-330 Husky aircraft — the Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) version of the Airbus A330 MRTT, based on the civilian A330-200 — has arrived in Canada. The aircraft, 330002, landed at Ottawa International Airport (CYOW) on Aug. 31.

The new CC-330 fleet will replace the RCAF’s current fleet of aging CC-150 Polaris aircraft in the strategic tanker transport capability (STTC) role.

The first CC-330 Husky arriving in Ottawa (YOW) on Aug. 31, 2023. Photo submitted by Lawrence Glew The first CC-330 Husky arriving in Ottawa (CYOW) on Aug. 31, 2023. Lawrence Glew Photo

In July, the Canadian government awarded Airbus Defence and Space with a $3.6 billion contract for four new Airbus-built A330 MRTTs and the conversion of five used A330-200s to the MRTT configuration. The contract is part of Canada’s STTC project, which determined in 2021 that Airbus’s A330 MRTT bid was the only one that met the RCAF’s requirements.

Among the five used A330-200s, two were acquired by Canada in July 2022 for US$102 million. A year later, three more were purchased for US$150 million. The aircraft were all previously operated by Kuwait Airways and acquired through International AirFinance Corporation.

While the five aircraft were formerly used for commercial operations, four will be converted to the full MRTT configuration — alongside four brand-new A330 MRTTs — capable of troop and cargo transport, aeromedical evacuation, and air-to-air refueling. The initial CC-330 delivered to Canada (330002) will be utilized for secure transport of high-ranking government officials. This particular aircraft wears a white Canadian government livery, while the remaining eight jets will receive an operational grey livery.

According to government officials, 330002 could be converted to a tanker at a later date, if needed.

image-1.jpg 330002 on the ramp at CYOW. Lawrence Glew Photo

Following its arrival in Ottawa, the first CC-330 will “continue its acceptance and retrofit activities,” according to the Canadian Armed Forces. All five of the used A330-200s are to receive a “limited retrofit” to bring them to the standard of a new A330-200. The fleet of nine CC-330 Huskies is to be powered by Rolls-Royce Trent 700 engines.

While 330002 is expected to enter service this fall in its VIP transport role, a second CC-330 will join the aircraft shortly and will also operate in a transport role until it is able to be converted into the MRTT configuration. The other three used A330-200s are to be delivered to Canada in the summer of 2024.

According to the federal government, the RCAF is expected to receive the first MRTT converted aircraft by 2025.

The four brand-new A330-200s will be assembled by Airbus at its Toulouse, France, site, and will enter the MRTT conversion line in Getafe, Spain, in mid-2025. The RCAF is expected to take delivery of both new and used MRTT aircraft (CC-330s) in 2027.

The fleet of nine CC-330 aircraft is to be operated by 437 Transport Squadron out of 8 Wing Trenton, Ont. — as is the case with the current Polaris fleet. The RCAF is still deciding on bases for eight of the aircraft, while the VIP transport aircraft will operate from CYOW.

CC-330.jpg

https://skiesmag.com/news/canada-takes-delivery-first-rcaf-cc-330-husky-aircraft/?utm_source=skies-daily-news-top-story&utm_campaign=skies-daily-news&utm_medium=email&utm_term=top-story&utm_content=V1

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A Canadian warship has at least 3 encounters with Chinese ships as it patrols contested waters

Aircrew aboard “Greywolf”, the Coyote helicopter that flies from the Canadian naval frigate “Ottawa”, load the 50 calibre machine gun.
Crew is shown aboard a Cyclone helicopter that flies from HMCS Ottawa. (Lyza Sale/CBC)

In less than a week since leaving the friendly port of Yokosuka, Japan, the Canadian warship HMCS Ottawa has had at least three interactions with suspected Chinese vessels, the most significant during an exercise in international waters with Japanese and American allies.

On Wednesday afternoon, the heavily armed Chinese destroyer, the Luyang, closely followed the convoy of ships in the East China Sea, calling out repeatedly to the Canadians on maritime radio, and coming within just over a kilometre of the allied ships. 

So close, the commanding officer of HMCS Ottawa called for his intelligence-gathering team to capture imagery of the vessel, to share with allies.

"They're as curious about our behaviour as we are of theirs," said navy Cmdr. Samuel Patchell from the command bridge as he peered out at the destroyer.

HMCS Ottawa in the East China Sea on a four-month deployment to the region, intended to exert freedom of movement for all ships in international waters. China claims some of these areas as its own.
HMCS Ottawa, shown here in the East China Sea, is on a four-month deployment to the Indo-Pacific region, intended to exert freedom of movement for all ships in international waters. China claims some of these areas as its own. (Lyza Sale/CBC)

Canada is among several nations increasing the frequency and number of ship deployments to the increasingly tense region. HMCS Ottawa is one of two Canadian frigates deployed for four months, along with MV Asterix, a supply vessel which refuels the frigates and other allied nations at sea to extend their operating ability.

CBC News has exclusive access with a team embedded on board HMCS Ottawa. 

Wednesday's encounter came just as China's navy — now the world's largest by number of ships — becomes increasingly assertive in the region, sometimes harassing military vessels transiting the Taiwan Strait or South China Sea. It claims portions of both as its own, while the majority of sea-going nations consider those areas to be international waters, where all vessels should have unhindered access.

In one major incident in June, a Chinese navy ship overtook a U.S. navy ship, then turned hard to cut it off, forcing the Americans to take evasive action in the disputed Taiwan Strait.

"China is trying to exert the same types of controls that countries do over national waterways," said David Perry, of the Canadian Global Affairs Institute, a Calgary-based think-tank.

"And if they can't do that, they harass others that are going through those areas and make it uncomfortable for people to exercise the right of free passage on the open ocean."

Just a day before the at-sea encounter with the Luyang, the Canadians were passed by the Dongjian, a new vessel used by the People's Liberation Army Navy, the official name of China's maritime force. 

Its primary purpose is believed to be the detection of submarines at extremely long range, but it may also have electronic surveillance equipment intended to scoop signals from nearby vessels.

HMCS Ottawa on patrol in the East China Sea.
HMCS Ottawa on patrol in the East China Sea. (David Common/CBC)

It's not clear if the ship was passing by chance — or design. But hours earlier, in the darkness, a small vessel used laser lights on HMCS Ottawa. 

"I actually got hit with the laser itself," Sailor 1st Class William Monkhouse-Beck told CBC News on the ship. "It can obviously cause permanent eye damage. What were they doing? We don't actually know. That's the danger of it."

Lasers can be used to detect range. And China has used what appears to be fishing vessels as part of its maritime surveillance program.

The small Chinese vessel also launched a drone toward HMCS Ottawa, but kept it at a distance. 

The Canadian ship is equipped by multiple weapons systems designed to detect, track and shoot down drones.

China’s Luyang destroyer gives way to the USS Ralph Johnson, a US Navy vessel, as it pulls away from an anti-submarine exercise with allies.
China's Luyang destroyer gives way to the USS Ralph Johnson, a U.S. navy vessel, as it pulls away from an anti-submarine exercise with allies. (Lysa Sale/CBC)

Canada focuses navy on Indo-Pacific

When Canada announced the latest deployment of warships to the Indo-Pacific region last month, Defence Minister Bill Blair said in a statement that the region "is vital to global security, and its importance will only increase in the coming years."

The deployment, he said, would help "to support a free, open and inclusive Indo-Pacific where international rules prevail."

It was a not-so-subtle jab at China's claims over waters in the region, particularly the Taiwan Strait, a body of water it would most likely use should it invade Taiwan.

China is contesting many areas, including Japanese islands and vast sections of water beyond China's normal economic exclusion zone.

Chinese fighter jets have also flown at great speed toward HMCS Ottawa, before turning away more than 32 kilometres from the ship.

Cdr Samuel Patchell, Commanding Officer of HMCS Ottawa, watches a Chinese warship operating nearby.
Cmdr. Samuel Patchell, commanding officer of HMCS Ottawa, watches a Chinese warship operating nearby.(Lyza Sale/CBC)

The culmination of the exercise this week involving the American, Japanese and Canadian ships was intended to be a photograph of the allied vessels taken from a helicopter.

But the Chinese ship remained so close to the group that it is featured in the image.

With the exercise ended, the U.S. ship hailed the Chinese vessel, warning over the radio that it intended to sharply turn in its direction.

The Chinese responded in English, the language used for international maritime communication, indicating they would give way.

The view from the command bridge of the Royal Canadian Navy vessel. On the left, a Japanese carrier. On the right, the USS Ralph Johnson of the US Navy. In the middle, the Chinese destroyer keeping watch.
The view from the command bridge of HMCS Ottawa. On the left, a Japanese carrier. On the right, the USS Ralph Johnson. At centre is the Chinese destroyer keeping watch. (David Common/CBC)

But their mission was not over.

As the various ships departed for their next tasks, the Chinese slipped behind the Canadian ships. A constant shadow on the sea.

The history of these encounters suggests that the same vessel may well track the Canadians through much of their four-month deployment in the region. 

And it isn't the only one. Another PLA Navy ship, a Jiangkai frigate, has been, at times, following the Canadian ships just out of visual range.

 

https://www.cbc.ca/news/world/hmcs-ottawa-east-china-sea-1.6959012

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The sad but inevitably Canadian result is coming to pass:

 

 

National Defence to roll out spending cuts over next three years - officials say extent of impact 'yet to be confirmed'

Chief of the Defence Staff Gen. Wayne Eyre said the process to find savings has started, but job losses are not expected.

Published Sep 08, 2023  •  Last updated 20 hours ago  •  3 minute read

 

Gen. Wayne Eyre.Gen. Wayne Eyre. Photo by Adrian Wyld /The Canadian Press

National Defence will roll out spending cuts over the next three years with senior officials acknowledging they don’t fully know the impact the reductions will have on the military or department.

In a new message to employees, Deputy Minister Bill Matthews and Chief of the Defence Staff Gen. Wayne Eyre said the process to find savings has already started. But the two noted that job losses are not expected.

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“Reductions related to operating expenditures will be phased in over three years and are not expected to result in job losses outside of normal attrition, or reallocation, ensuring that our people’s work is focused on high-priority initiatives,” Matthews and Eyre noted in the Sept. 6 message. “Similarly, reductions identified related to professional services and travel will have no impact on employment levels. The extent of impact is yet to be confirmed.”

In August, Treasury Board President Anita Anand informed her fellow federal cabinet ministers that they will be required to cut $15.4 billion in government spending. An initial deadline of Oct. 2 was provided.

Anand has said the Liberal government wants to ensure public funds are spent wisely while delivering on key platform promises like dental and child care.

Matthews and Eyre said the federal government intends to bring the growth of government spending back to a pre-pandemic level.

“As one of the largest federal departments, National Defence has an important role to play in effective and efficient government operations,” they told staff. “Early efforts are now underway across the Defence Team to address our part in this initiative by developing spending reduction options.”

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The effort to cut spending is separate from the Defence Policy Update, they noted. That process, to chart a future course for National Defence and the Canadian military, has been underway for more than a year. No date for the release of that update has been made public.

The quest for spending cuts “will entail hard decisions,” Matthews and Eyre informed military staff and public servants. “However, this is not about doing more with less or arbitrary cost-cutting. It is about ensuring the defence budget is directed toward top defence and government priorities.”

June Winger, national president of the Union of National Defence Employees, said the department has been wasting large amounts of money hiring contractors and consultants. She argues that such a policy provides fewer services to the department for the amount of money being spent.

“Hundreds of millions of dollars are spent in this shell game, with substantial profits going to private corporations in Canada, and across the globe,” Winger noted. “If National Defence is serious about ensuring budget cuts will not negatively impact the ability of the CAF to perform its functions, the best way to do that is by providing a budget to hire an adequate number of employees.”

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She said the union has provided National Defence senior management with a comprehensive report that shows contracting out is more costly and offers the military less flexibility. “I challenge the National Defence leadership to open their minds to addressing these budgetary restraints not as those before them have attempted and failed at, but with effective long-term plans to build the public service not only meet the budgetary goals, but benefit the Canadian economy,” Winger added.

Over the last several months, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has faced a public relations barrage from defence analysts and retired senior officers, many with links to National Defence or military equipment firms, to boost military spending.

They, along with NATO officials, have been pushing the Liberal government to add another $20 billion a year to the existing $29 billion defence budget.

The Liberal government has resisted such a massive increase, pointing out that Canada is the seventh largest spender in NATO and is ranked 14th in the world for military spending.

David Pugliese is an award-winning journalist covering Canadian Forces and military issues in Canada. To support his work, including exclusive content for subscribers only, sign up here: ottawacitizen.com/subscribe
 

https://ottawacitizen.com/news/national/defence-watch/national-defence-to-roll-out-spending-cuts-over-next-three-years-officials-say-extent-of-impact-yet-to-be-confirmed

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Trudeau and Canadian G20 delegation still in New Delhi after plane grounded
 

…The prime minister's trip took a turn Sunday when his office announced the delegation's plane — the Canadian Armed Forces-managed CFC001 — is experiencing "technical issues" and will not leave as scheduled tonight.

"These issues are not fixable overnight, our delegation will be staying in India until alternate arrangements are made," said PMO spokesperson Mohammad Hussain in a statement to reporters.

Canada's air force is in the midst of a process to replace the existing plane used to shuttle the prime minister on international trips, a CC-150 Polaris, with a more modern Airbus A330-200 transport plane. The military recently signed a $3.6-billion contract with Airbus to replace its transport fleet.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/world/g20-communique-russia-trudeau-1.6962198

 

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A little bit of sense form an Airforce prerspetive

 

Michel Maisonneuve: I'm a veteran, I'm allowed to have an opinion, even a conservative one

What the CAF needs is proper funding, not permission to wear nail polish and man-buns

 

Last week, Carleton University Prof. Stephen Saideman, a dual citizen of Canada and the United States, blamed the Conservative party for politicizing the Canadian military. Writing in the Globe and Mail, he points to the fact that I would be speaking at the Conservative Party of Canada’s policy convention as support. He reminds readers of the speech I delivered in Ottawa last fall when I received the Vimy Award for my “significant, outstanding and enduring contribution to the defence and security of our nation and the preservation of our democratic values.” There, I spoke against Canada’s rejection of history, embrace of cancel culture and the declining state of the military.

https://nationalpost.com/opinion/michel-maisonneuve-criticizing-the-government-does-not-politicize-the-military

 

 

 

 

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2 hours ago, ExFlyer said:

A little bit of sense form an Airforce prerspetive

 

Michel Maisonneuve: I'm a veteran, I'm allowed to have an opinion, even a conservative one

What the CAF needs is proper funding, not permission to wear nail polish and man-buns

 

Last week, Carleton University Prof. Stephen Saideman, a dual citizen of Canada and the United States, blamed the Conservative party for politicizing the Canadian military. Writing in the Globe and Mail, he points to the fact that I would be speaking at the Conservative Party of Canada’s policy convention as support. He reminds readers of the speech I delivered in Ottawa last fall when I received the Vimy Award for my “significant, outstanding and enduring contribution to the defence and security of our nation and the preservation of our democratic values.” There, I spoke against Canada’s rejection of history, embrace of cancel culture and the declining state of the military.

https://nationalpost.com/opinion/michel-maisonneuve-criticizing-the-government-does-not-politicize-the-military

 

 

 

 

This is the same man a few months ago was hauled over the coals for his opinions during an award speech... For some reason we as a nation have a tough time with criticism of any kind, and when we do i is meet with anger...but then again criticism or questioning anything from the left is considered violence, and life threating...  

What are they going to do when the conservatives do win the election, and when questioning anything from the left is going to be a regular thing the streets will run red with all their leftist heads exploding and popping off....we might all want to invest in mops and buckets to clean up all the leftists shit left behind in the last 8 years... 

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12 hours ago, Army Guy said:

This is the same man a few months ago was hauled over the coals for his opinions during an award speech... For some reason we as a nation have a tough time with criticism of any kind, and when we do i is meet with anger...but then again criticism or questioning anything from the left is considered violence, and life threating...  

What are they going to do when the conservatives do win the election, and when questioning anything from the left is going to be a regular thing the streets will run red with all their leftist heads exploding and popping off....we might all want to invest in mops and buckets to clean up all the leftists shit left behind in the last 8 years... 

Who was hauled over the coals during an awards speech? For what? When? Please cite.

I am not sure what about the article offends you? I agree with his take on the political/military relationship. I do not see a left/right issue in the article. I see an ex military person complaining about the state of the military over the past decades.

I am asking because I do not know and never heard of Michael .Maisonneuve till this article.

 

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6 hours ago, ExFlyer said:

Who was hauled over the coals during an awards speech? For what? When? Please cite.

I am not sure what about the article offends you? I agree with his take on the political/military relationship. I do not see a left/right issue in the article. I see an ex military person complaining about the state of the military over the past decades.

I am asking because I do not know and never heard of Michael .Maisonneuve till this article.

 

Speech slamming Canada's climate change policies, cancel culture ... | Ottawa Citizen

Justin Trudeau's 'woke agenda' critiqued at Conservative event | CTV News

'Making Canada better': Excerpt from ex-general's anti-woke speech that caused an uproar | National Post

There are plenty of more examples of what happened to this ex gen after his speech he gave after accepting an award and now continues to give speeches at varies events including the Conservative convention. He has been chastised by military leadership loyal to the current CDS, about commenting on dress policies, and leadership decisions...but also by the civlian defense community, and of course the liberal MP's as they to where mentioned in his criticism. The fact he got a stand up obviation after his speech mostly by serving military members also in attendance is telling....

What pisses me off is the fact only comments approved by the leftist regime are acceptable, and i understand those comments by those loyal to current CDS, but to cast him as a renegade after 35 years of loyal service is a bit much, and the media did a massive hit job on him as well , it just seems everyone jumped on the same train. that no one could except his criticism as constructive, or pointing to the lack of thought put into DND as a whole...

I agree with you he should have gotten kudos for bring up something that has already been brought up millions of times, by almost every veteran, and often by the same media that roasted him for his effort.  

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28 minutes ago, Army Guy said:

Speech slamming Canada's climate change policies, cancel culture ... | Ottawa Citizen

Justin Trudeau's 'woke agenda' critiqued at Conservative event | CTV News

'Making Canada better': Excerpt from ex-general's anti-woke speech that caused an uproar | National Post

There are plenty of more examples of what happened to this ex gen after his speech he gave after accepting an award and now continues to give speeches at varies events including the Conservative convention. He has been chastised by military leadership loyal to the current CDS, about commenting on dress policies, and leadership decisions...but also by the civlian defense community, and of course the liberal MP's as they to where mentioned in his criticism. The fact he got a stand up obviation after his speech mostly by serving military members also in attendance is telling....

What pisses me off is the fact only comments approved by the leftist regime are acceptable, and i understand those comments by those loyal to current CDS, but to cast him as a renegade after 35 years of loyal service is a bit much, and the media did a massive hit job on him as well , it just seems everyone jumped on the same train. that no one could except his criticism as constructive, or pointing to the lack of thought put into DND as a whole...

I agree with you he should have gotten kudos for bring up something that has already been brought up millions of times, by almost every veteran, and often by the same media that roasted him for his effort.  

I read the articles.

The only chastising came from an civilian military analyst and one Colonel.

I think what he said in his speech wars right on and to the point. I can also see that "those loyal to current CDS" and "the liberal MP's"  because both groups got slapped in the face by a deserving honerable  Military member.

Yes, kudos to him for saying what he did.

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Long hair, signing bonuses and 'try before you buy': How Canada's military is responding to a staffing crisis
 

1 in 10 positions in Armed Forces is unfilled and recruitment isn’t keeping up

David Common · CBC News · Posted: Sep 13, 2023 4:00 AM EDT | Last Updated: 11 hours ago
A person wearing a naval uniform and a cap works at a computer.
Sailor 1st Class Anton Parker works in the machinery control room of HMCS Vancouver during its current deployment in the Indo-Pacific region. A year ago, the Canadian military changed its dress standards, allowing long hair and more as part of an effort to keep soldiers and sailors from quitting the Armed Forces.(David Common/CBC)

Anton Parker followed in his grandfather's footsteps with a career in the Royal Canadian Navy. 

With the longest hair of his life, complemented with a handlebar mustache and mutton chop sideburns, his grandfather might not even recognize him as a military sailor.

"The military should strive for discipline and uniformity," Parker said while on board HMCS Vancouver, a frigate deployed in the Indo-Pacific region. "But there's a need in the modern world for people to express individuality. The navy is trying to strike that balance."

On the same ship, some sailors have pink hair, others multiple earrings in each ear. 

Even face tattoos are OK.

The decision is one way of "addressing the tension created by accelerated generational change," Gen. Wayne Eyre, the chief of defence staff, said in a videoannouncing the change. "Uniformity does not equal discipline … any more than the colour or length of your hair defines your commitment." 

The relaxation of dress standards a year ago across the Canadian Armed Forces may surprise veterans who lived through far stricter times, but it is part of a larger effort to make the Forces more attractive to new recruits and to retain experienced members like Sailor 1st Class Parker, who has served with the Royal Canadian Navy for seven years.

A sailor looks out from the bridge of a naval vessel.
Sailor 1st Class William Monkhouse-Beck gazes out from the bridge of HMCS Ottawa earlier this month. During this deployment in the Indo-Pacific region, he has a series of duties, including keeping watch on the horizon for any threats. (Lyza Sale/CBC)

The navy is "understaffed right now, we're heavily understaffed," Parker said. "There are a lot of vacant positions."

At least 10,000 positions across the CAF are empty, representing one in 10 roles. The chief of defence staff has warned it will get worse before it gets better.

"I am very, very worried about our numbers," Eyre told a House of Commons committee in April.

"Our readiness is going down within the Canadian Armed Forces," he said. "The military we have today is not the one we need for the future."

WATCH | Tense moment for Canadian warship:
ST_COMMON_CHINA_NAVY_clean.jpg?crop=1.77
The Canadian frigate HMCS Ottawa, on a joint patrol mission with U.S. and Japanese warships in the East China Sea, had a tense moment with a Chinese-guided missile destroyer. A CBC News crew with exclusive access caught it on camera.

The CAF has added 10,731 new members since 2020, but those gains have been offset by retirements and departures from the ranks — which have left the Armed Forces in a continued deficit.

In spite of signing bonuses of up to $20,000 based on a candidate's qualifications, the Forces have been unable to replace members who leave.

A sailor salutes during a ceremony on board a naval vessel.
Sailor 2nd Class Raven Goddard salutes during her promotion ceremony on board HMCS Ottawa, where she works in the sonar department. The Royal Canadian Navy is short personnel, particularly those in mid-career leadership roles. (Lyza Sale/CBC)

Demands for military spike

It comes at a moment of high operational tempo. In other words, the military is very busy.

The army has deployed 1,000 soldiers to NATO's border with Russia in Latvia. Hundreds of other troops are training Ukrainian forces on tanks, medical treatment and urban warfare on deployments that last months. 

The air force remains involved in ferrying equipment and ammunition to aid Ukraine's fight and the navy has shifted its focus to the Indo-Pacific, with three of its vessels currently deployed near waters contested by China.

There's also the urgent and growing number of requests for help inside Canada during wildfires, floods and storm recovery.

Two sailors work on a naval vessel.
Sailor 2nd Class Justin Hunt-Benoit, left, and Sailor 3rd Class Benoit Belanger are among the newest recruits on board HMCS Ottawa. Both joined the Royal Canadian Navy two years ago. This is their first deployment, serving four months in the Indo-Pacific region. (Lyza Sale/CBC)

"Everyone is burnt out," said Charlotte Duval-Lantoine, Ottawa operations manager with the Canadian Global Affairs Institute.

Then there's the CAF's reputation problem, driven by serious allegations and criminal charges for sexual assault and harassment, often at the highest levels of the Forces since 2015, which has been covered extensively by Canadian media.

"We have seen scandals related to discrimination and sexual misconduct in the military," said Duval-Lantoine. "And because most Canadians don't have direct contact with the military … that might deter them from joining the military."

Testing the waters

Those who join the military have historically signed a multi-year contract, and the CAF says it has found such a commitment can be a barrier in attracting recruits.

"Life in the navy can be demanding and challenging at times — it is not for everyone", the commander of the Royal Canadian Navy, Vice-Admiral Angus Topshee, said in a news release in March announcing the navy's proposed solution.

"The aim of the [Naval Experience Program] is simple: to reduce the amount of time it takes to train civilians as sailors," the navy said in a the news release, "and to attract those who enjoy the unique lifestyle that the navy offers." 

It's "a bit of try before you buy," said Prof. Alan Okros of the Canadian Forces College, a Toronto-based facility that provides graduate-level military education.

WATCH | Canadian warship crosses contested strait: 
taiwan.jpg?crop=1.777xh:h;*,*&downsize=5
HMCS Ottawa entered the Taiwan Strait and was flanked by three Chinese warships armed with missiles and torpedoes. They shadowed Ottawa's moves for the entire crossing.

The NEP is a bit like doing a test drive on several cars. 

New recruits are sped through basic training in eight weeks and then cycled through different job types through the remainder of the year, including fast-tracked efforts to get new recruits on a ship at sea as quickly as possible.

At the end, they can sign on to the regular force as full-time members or reservists, or leave altogether, with no strings attached.

As of this month, only 33 members have enrolled in the Naval Experience Program, but 364 are in various stages of the application process — including those who have accepted offers.

Nearly one-third of applicants identify as visible minorities or Indigenous, a key priority for the military.

1 in 10 on deployed warship new to navy

Twenty-seven of HMCS Vancouver's 240 crew members have been in the military for less than two years. Some members of the Forces do not deploy internationally for several years after joining, but the navy has made efforts in recent years to offer opportunities earlier to newer sailors.

Those on the Vancouver are, for instance, then able to visit other countries, such as Japan and Thailand, when their ships come in to port for several days to restock.

The Armed Forces have also opened up the ranks to permanent residents in a bid to cast a wider net for new members.

A naval ship sails in a large body of water under a grey sky.
HMCS Ottawa sails in the Pacific Ocean off Okinawa, Japan, earlier this month. Members of the military can be deployed abroad, often for months at a time, which can be a deterrent for potential recruits seeking greater work-life balance. (Lyza Sale/CBC)

Where Canadians live is also at odds with the location of many military bases, which may also be a factor in recruitment and retention.

More than 80 per cent of Canadians live in cities, but most military bases are in smaller communities, like Petawawa, Ont., or Cold Lake, Alta.

Convincing young people to sign up to a life away from big city conveniences, said Okros, is increasingly challenging. 

"There's choices around work and life balance," said Okros. "Everybody is looking at putting more of a priority on balancing life and family obligations."

He also points to economic conditions as a factor impacting recruitment. The military is competing for talent during a period of low unemployment, when those entering the workforce may have multiple options.

Challenges across all jobs

In a statement to CBC News, the Royal Canadian Navy says it "has been challenged over the past few years to recruit, train and retain diverse Canadian talent" and that now means "all occupations are short personnel."

Most acute are those at mid-level leadership, as many sailors depart the service before their retirement date.

Marine technician and naval communicator occupations are the positions most challenged to recruit, generate and retain personnel, according to the navy.

A sailor checks a machine gun on the deck of a naval ship.
Sailor 1st Class Alexis Desy checks a machine gun on HMCS Vancouver during a port visit to Yokusuka, Japan, in August 2023. (David Common/CBC)

At 22, Alexis Desy is among the youngest sailors aboard HMCS Vancouver.

"This could be a career," he said. "I'm only two years in, it's my first deployment, still getting a sense of what the job is."

Keeping the newest recruits will be the challenge, especially after a significant investment of training dollars.

"Younger people are changing jobs more often and so staying in one institution is not really appealing for them right now," said Duval-Lantoine.

Top commanders have made attracting new members the highest priority for the military, dedicating additional staff to recruiting efforts — while acknowledging military strength (a term used to describe the number of soldiers and sailors relative to need) is likely to worsen in the short term.

Parker sees it as an opportunity.

"As an old supervisor of mine once put it — take advantage of the chaos … there is a lot of work to be done and a lot of vacant positions."
 

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/canadian-armed-forces-recruitment-1.6963988

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9 hours ago, ExFlyer said:

I read the articles.

The only chastising came from an civilian military analyst and one Colonel.

I think what he said in his speech wars right on and to the point. I can also see that "those loyal to current CDS" and "the liberal MP's"  because both groups got slapped in the face by a deserving honerable  Military member.

Yes, kudos to him for saying what he did.

There are many media experts that did not have anything good to say about the Gen, surprises like the guy that does the military articles pulguise ( ottawa paper)not sure how to spell his name, plus the guy that writes the Military magazine, esprite du corp both did a negative piece, plus another of his writers did a negative piece, many of the other media papers also reported negatively...It was more of a cancel culture thinking , this is how the old school military thinks , these are the guys holding back todays military, this is not how we want our military to work...stuff like that, also criticized those military that gave him a standing obviation as not those we want leading troops...there were other military that were interviewed that gave negative remarks , the gen in charge of change made a statement, along with a few of those linked to her office, and a few more.. If I'm not wrong should be a ton of post here in the forum down on the topic with better links....

I think those comments only solidified the Gens comments, and now he takes it on the road...and talks to any group that will listen....

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Not a fan of the Militaries new dress reg's, makes them look unprofessional, out of control, not disciplined, trashy... ....everyone is an individual, not part of a well oiled, well disciplined force... if there is anything i learned in Afghanistan if you did not look the part, like a member on a professional force , that looked like soldiers, and knew how to operate as a professional soldier they would target you over and over.

there are reasons we used to have tight grooming standards, today we just shrug , the other day i saw a army soldier with a mohawk with a pony tail....i just laughed i wonder what he would do if someone got a hold of that pony tail in a fight...

Why is it most police forces do not follow the same path, or fire fighters,  

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15 hours ago, Army Guy said:

There are many media experts that did not have anything good to say about the Gen, surprises like the guy that does the military articles pulguise ( ottawa paper)not sure how to spell his name, plus the guy that writes the Military magazine, esprite du corp both did a negative piece, plus another of his writers did a negative piece, many of the other media papers also reported negatively...It was more of a cancel culture thinking , this is how the old school military thinks , these are the guys holding back todays military, this is not how we want our military to work...stuff like that, also criticized those military that gave him a standing obviation as not those we want leading troops...there were other military that were interviewed that gave negative remarks , the gen in charge of change made a statement, along with a few of those linked to her office, and a few more.. If I'm not wrong should be a ton of post here in the forum down on the topic with better links....

I think those comments only solidified the Gens comments, and now he takes it on the road...and talks to any group that will listen....

Military experts, well, Pugliese, form the Ottawa papers, used to be a good reporter until he started to spout opinion. He is not well liked in the military community, not for his reporting but for his opinions. He does not get interviews anymore so, he has become a hater in the opinion of military personnel.

Esprit de Corps used to be a fantastic pro military magazine then Scot Taylor, the editor became a critic when he was not given access to military personnel and press. He recruited a disgraced military officer Michel Drapeau (who became a lawyer) and started to inundate the Military with freedom of information requests ($5 each request) and sell that information to the press.

The officer corps has always been an old boys club. Having lived and worked in  Ottawa and NDHQ, I could very much see that. I hate to say this but having been a CWO,/RSM there is also an old boys club in the CWO rank. I attended quite a few CWO/RSM meeting until I could not stand it any more. I sat through 3 monthly meetings where the main topic was what a CWO/RSM ring should look like LOL

Anyway, if I read toy correctly, you agree with the ex Air Force officers comments. I agree with him as well.

Edited by ExFlyer
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Report cites human factors in CC-150 collision in Guam

By Chris Thatcher | September 13, 2023

Estimated reading time 7 minutes, 39 seconds. 

Human factors may have been the cause of an accident at Andersen Air Force Base (AFB) in Guam between a CC-150 Polaris and a French Air Force A400M at the end of Exercise Mobility Guardian.

The Polaris, 150003, a strategic transport aircraft, had landed the day before, on July 21, to bring back equipment and personnel participating in the two-week multinational training event. The crew had flown from 8 Wing Trenton, Ont., through Hickam AFB in Hawaii, before touching down in Guam just before 21:45 local time.

The aircraft was parked in spot N24 by military ground crew involved in Ex Mobility Guardian, and was then loaded with equipment and baggage. According to a preliminary report by the Department of National Defence (DND) Airworthiness Investigative Authority, “the aircraft was partially secured (without chocks)” for the night.

Screen-Shot-2023-09-13-at-11.46.10-AM-10 The CC-150’s right horizontal and vertical stabilizer contacted the empennage of the French Air Force A400M (shown left). Photo by Capt Lehnart, 2 Ere SV

“At approximately 10:30 local the following morning, the aircraft began to roll backwards, nose veering to the left, and continued to roll until the right horizontal and vertical stabilizer contacted the empennage of a French Air Force A400M parked on spot N22. Following contact, the CC-150 rebounded forward coming to rest approximately eight metres from the point of impact,” the investigator found.

Both the Canadian and French aircraft “sustained serious damage,” according to the report, but no personnel were injured.

Since there was no evidence of technical issues with the CC-150, the investigation is now focused on “procedures, communications, and human factors.”

The Polaris remains in Guam and the Air Force is assessing whether the aircraft can be repaired or should be retired.

“As of now, the course of action for the aircraft in question is still being determined,” a DND spokesperson stated.

Exercise Mobility Guardian is a biennial training event hosted by the U.S. Air Force Air Mobility Command. Normally a North American exercise for U.S. and Canadian aircrews, in 2023 it was expanded to a multinational event for all the Five Eyes partners: Australia, New Zealand, and the United Kingdom, as well as France and Japan. Set in a scenario stretching across the Indo-Pacific, participants conducted air mobility training in support of other regional exercises, including transport and air drops, air-to-air refuelling, and aeromedical evacuation.

The Canadian Air Task Force included a tactical airlift detachment of two CC-130J Hercules and an air-to-air refuelling detachment of one CC-150T Polaris tanker, as well as the respective aircrews, operations personnel, and maintenance teams from 436 Transport Squadron and 437 Transport Squadron. It also contained an aeromedical evacuation team, an Expeditionary Air Traffic Management team from 8 Air Communications and Control Squadron, and a Mobile Air Movements Section.

The Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) is currently in the process of replacing the CC-150 Polaris fleet with nine Airbus A330-200 Multi Role Tanker Transport (MRTT) aircraft. The Canadian government on July 25 awarded a contract of about $3.6 billion to Airbus Defence and Space for the purchase of four new Airbus-built A330 MRTTs and the conversion of five used A330-200s to the MRTT configuration.

While the five CC-150 aircraft have a service life expectancy to 2027, some of the fleet may need to be replaced sooner. A CC-150 transporting Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and delegates to and from a G20 summit in India this week remains on the ground following the detection of a faulty part during the preflight check. A replacement part is being flown commercially to India by an Air Force technician.

20230722-cc150-img1.jpg The A400M (left) and the CC-150 Polaris seen on the tarmac in Guam after the incident. Photo by MSgt Haynes, 36 Wing FS, Andersen AFB, Guam

In October 2019, a CC-150 rolled into a hangar wall 8 Wing Trenton while being towed. The “structural damage to the nose and right engine cowling” was significant and the plane was out of service for 16 months.

Consequently, the Strategic Tanker Transport Capability (STTC) project has taken on some urgency.

The government acquired two A330-200 planes in July 2022 for US$102 million and then three more in July 2023 for US$150 million. The aircraft were all previously operated by Kuwait Airways and acquired through International AirFinance Corporation.

“The procurement of used aircraft for this capability is a viable option given that military rates of annual flight hour consumption are typically less than commercial rates,” the government stated. “Thus, a used commercial aircraft that has a modest number of hours flown on it can still achieve a full military service life of 30 years.”

The five used A330-200 aircraft will receive a “limited retrofit” to bring them to the standard of a new A300-200, and will be powered by the same Rolls-Royce Trent 700 engines as the four additional Airbus-built aircraft.

Eight of the nine aircraft, to be called the CC-330 Husky, will adopt operational grey livery and be converted to the full MRTT mission suite of troop and cargo transport, aeromedical evacuation, and air-to-air refuelling – with both boom and hose and drogue systems.

However, the first one, 330002, which landed at Ottawa International Airport on Aug. 31, is painted in the white Canadian government livery and will be assigned secure transport of government officials.

https://skiesmag.com/news/report-cites-human-factors-cc-150-polaris-collision-guam/?utm_source=skies-daily-news-top-story&utm_campaign=skies-daily-news&utm_medium=email&utm_term=top-story&utm_content=V1

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11 minutes ago, BeaverFever said:

Report cites human factors in CC-150 collision in Guam

All this time I was assuming it was the French at fault since initial reports only said nobody was aboard the Canadian aircraft. Alas someone didn’t chock the wheels of the RCAF plane. Would that be the responsibility of ground crew from RCAF or the host nation (USA)?

Also I notice that this plane is painted in VIP transport livery rather than the grey operational livery despite being a tactical exercise which I think just speaks to the desperate state of the fleet: they just have to use whatever plane is available, no ability to dedicate specific aircraft to specific roles or the time/money to repaint when the fleet is rotated. 

Edited by BeaverFever
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