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Great Movie Villains


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-for sheer campy fun, I think Khan from Star Trek II is a classic.

-k

Agreed! If it wasn't for the fact that it was a science fiction movie Ricardo Montalbon should have been nominated for an Oscar! I never knew he was that good an actor!

That death scene of his, where he hurls his spite at Kirk, was a classic!

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The best, nastiest, scariest movie villain that everyone cheered most when he was killed?

The alien from Alien.

No way, everyone cheered way more when the alien got that little butt-sniff from the corporation that wanted the alien for bio-weapons research. Everyone except Morris that is, he probably cried.

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I'm surprised that this thread is nearly 10 posts old and nobody has mentioned The Joker yet.

-k

Joker?

I understand that this thread is about Hollywood, but I fear no one here understands true evil.

As movies go, this is the closest dramatization that I have seen. Luis Bunuel's Un chien andalou (For the squeamish, the shot was filmed with a razor and an egg - not an eye.)

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Joker?

I understand that this thread is about Hollywood, but I fear no one here understands true evil.

As movies go, this is the closest dramatization that I have seen. Luis Bunuel's Un chien andalou (For the squeamish, the shot was filmed with a razor and an egg - not an eye.)

I disagree; in terms of dramatizing evil, I have seen several more telling scenes, just recently, made by four contemporary European directors: Inside, in which a baby is cut out of a screaming woman by another psychopathic woman who wants a child; Martyrs, in which an organization kidnaps and tortures people, hoping their victims will receive a transcendent glimpse of the afterlife; The Human Centipede, in which a Mengele-inspired surgeon wishes to construct a "centipede" from three people with a single digestive tract (nasty, I assure you); and Funny Games, a postmodernist spin on the killer-thriller which demands audience culpability in the brutality.

All of them make the clip here look like a Disney film; not in the gore (though they are more gory), but in the sensibilities of the movies themselves, which feel nihilistic, inducing a kind of dread that's rare in Hollywood films. I only didn't include any of these in my list because I chose to go with movies more widely seen.

Edited by bloodyminded
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I disagree; in terms of dramatizing evil, I have seen several more telling scenes, just recently, made by four contemporary European directors: Inside, in which a baby is cut out of a screaming woman by another psychopathic woman who wants a child; Martyrs, in which an organization kidnaps and tortures people, hoping their victims will receive a transcendent glimpse of the afterlife; The Human Centipede, in which a Mengele-inspired surgeon wishes to construct a "centipede" from three people with a single digestive tract (nasty, I assure you); and Funny Games, a postmodernist spin on the killer-thriller which demands audience culpability in the brutality.

And insight into your forum handle perhaps?

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:) No, that's a fuuny coincidence, nothing more. "Bloodyminded" was meant to be a little jab at myself: the kind of poster who is not always the most civil debate opponent.

My second youngest has taken his youthful exuberance for movies into a desire for film and film criticism at the higher education level. While he is partial to the zombies and campy slasher genre, I am certainly going to recommend he view the titles you provided. He much preferred the original Spanish REC to the American remake Quarantine and I think a little European type gore will round out his perspective. :lol:

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I was dragged out to see Sex in the city 2 and I'd have to say, Sarah Jessica Parker probably takes the cake as far as psychotic villainy is concerned- a neurotic, ugly, empty shell of a human being... in fact she outdoes the Joker in terms of hate-filled insanity (and has slightly more ridiculous makeup).

In fact they should cast her in Batman's Arkham Asylum...

she's like an unwitty woody allen... (with a bigger schnoz)

worst of all there's no hero to actively fight her... nightmare all around...

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My second youngest has taken his youthful exuberance for movies into a desire for film and film criticism at the higher education level. While he is partial to the zombies and campy slasher genre, I am certainly going to recommend he view the titles you provided. He much preferred the original Spanish REC to the American remake Quarantine and I think a little European type gore will round out his perspective. :lol:

I can't speak for the discipline of film and film theory: I'm an amateur enthusiast, I guess you could say.

But yeah, I thought REC was far better.

I got into this "new wave" of European horror, as it's being dubbed, via a recent, renewed interest in late 60s and 1970s era American horror. At that time, the Americans were pushing the envelope, with "Night of the Living Dead," "Texas Chainsaw Massacre" and a bunch of others. It wasn't just the gore (though that was part of it): it was an embracing of a new sensibility. Horror movies were no longer providing "chills," but attacking the audience with a full-frontal assault. Often toying with nihilism and cultural tropes, they offerred social critiques (not always coherently...but they're always there), along with a sense of dread and horror that later specimen like "Friday 13th" simply don't pull off.

So in recent years, European directors, including some already established and respected directors, have consciously decided to push the envelope in the horror genre; since North Americans have proven unwilling to do so any more.

And I'm telling you, "Inside," "Martyrs," and "Funny Games" are really, really scary. Even upsetting, actually.

Awesome stuff.

Edited by bloodyminded
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I can't speak for the discipline of film and film theory: I'm an amateur enthusiast, I guess you could say.

But yeah, I thought REC was far better.

I got into this "new wave" of European horror, as it's being dubbed, via a recent, renewed interest in late 60s and 1970s era American horror. At that time, the Americans were pushing the envelope, with "Night of the Living Dead," "Texas Chainsaw Massacre" and a bunch of others. It wasn't just the gore (though that was part of it): it was an embracing of a new sensibility. Horror movies were no longer providing "chills," but attacking the audience with a full-frontal assault. Often toying with nihilism and cultural tropes, they offerred social critiques (not always coherently...but they're always there), along with a sense of dread and horror that later specimen like "Friday 13th" simply don't pull off.

So in recent years, European directors, including some already established and respected directors, have consciously decided to push the envelope in the horror genre; since North Americans have proven unwilling to do so any more.

And I'm telling you, "Inside," "Martyrs," and "Funny Games" are really, really scary. Even upsetting, actually.

Awesome stuff.

I guess horror genre in Europe has changed quite a bit since the 'Mad Butcher of Vienna.' :lol:

However, the original Texas Chainsaw Massacre is, to me, the benchmark and has yet to be duplicated. The original Leatherface, great movie villain!

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  • 2 weeks later...

However, the original Texas Chainsaw Massacre is, to me, the benchmark and has yet to be duplicated. The original Leatherface, great movie villain!

The original Texas Chainsaw Massacre is probably the scariest horror film ever. I'm a big horror fan, been watching them since i was a kid actually (don't know what my parents were thinking lol letting their 10 y/o kid rent any horror flick he wanted). First watched the movie when i was about 17 with a buddy of mine, about 3/4 the way through i had to shut it off, there was a part where the movie just got freaky with the Chainsaw family sitting at the table, feeding their dead relative blood or something, and a women victim watching all this and just screaming non-stop.

I was just like "ok i gotta take a break, this is f'ed" lol. The movie is just so raw and minimalist, virtually no soundtrack/score. A classic.

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