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Moonbox

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Everything posted by Moonbox

  1. Most of the bigger networks/media groups are relatively "honest", insofar as their factual reporting is concerned. Whether people call them honest or dishonest has more to do with how they feel about their editorial stance. They (generally) don't allow made-up balogna to be broadcasted. That says very little. Are we going to say that CNN is right-wing when they regularly drag Republican pundits on the air? Hardly.
  2. Unlikely. They were never friendly to the Harper Conservatives, and gushed for Trudeau in the early days. The CBC is not the same sort of leftwing hackjob that the Toronto Star is, but they still do far too much editorializing and pro-Liberal coverage than they should for a public broadcaster. You mean it says more things that you LIKE, and less things that you DON'T LIKE. 🙄
  3. True enough, but making it easier for them doesn't help anyone but them. 🤷‍♂️
  4. If anything, you're making it seem more complicated than it is. A corporate tax floor is the definition of simple. MNC profit shifting and tax arbitrage is an absurdity. The only complicated thing about it is getting large-scale buy-in, which they appear to be getting.
  5. North American public transit is deficient because of wokeness? What can't you people bogeyman with that? 🤣
  6. It wouldn't, because underwriters use gross (pre-tax) income to qualify borrowers. That's true for both the lenders, and even more so for the insurers who underwrite high-ratio mortgages. It's kind of a non-choice. The math on this would be so bad that it'd be nothing but a latent tax trap that would keep lower income families perpetually poor. Unfortunately you're wrong. Lack of supply is definitely one of the biggest problems, but real-estate speculation has driven up prices dramatically as well. There was something like 1.3M vacant homes in Canada in 2022 - airbnbs, foreign students whose parents needed somewhere safe to park cash etc. 25 years ago, investment companies didn't play this game at all. Now, over 20% of purpose-built rentals are owned by large financial landlords (think REITs, fund companies etc) that make their money by turning over tenants any way they can and jacking the rents. No, but it will discourage speculative investing. I suspect we're going to see a lot of these airbnbs etc hit the market before the new rules take effect.
  7. If the priority is to actually make it easier for first time homebuyers to get homes, the policy needs to have a surgical focus on that. This does far more for the wealthy than it does for renters trying to break into the market, and wouldn't help them qualify. It would be a devil's bargain - pay a little bit less now so you can pay orders of magnitude more later and leave nothing for your kids. You'd be crazy to take that deal. The $250,000 threshold means that 99% of people will never encounter it, outside of real-estate speculation. Real-estate speculation is something that's poisoned Canada's allocation of capital since the turn of the century, and discouraging that is good policy (IMO). The collateral damage is the real problem. Small business owners (like doctors) who want to sell their business will now either eat shit when they sell their practices, or they'll have to set up complicated, clunky and expensive succession plans where they sell the practice off over years to stay under the threshold. Dumb.
  8. That's not what's being debated, donkey. Nobody, anywhere, ever argued that population density doesn't help spread viruses, which in turns leads to more deaths. Once again, you're just debating yourself. The point of contention is that the USA's horrendously bad COVID performance wasn't because of population density. There are 185 countries in the world with higher population densities than the US, but only 13 that did worse with COVID. 🙃 Obviously, other factors were at play...
  9. It must be hard to have spent the last several years angrily shouting at people, whilst getting laughed at. I have the intelligence to understand that the scientific and medical consensus is worth more than the bitter ranting of buffoons doing their own research on Facebook etc. You're a real Karen's Karen.
  10. Do you need to speak to the manager, Karen? It's always a good laugh to see you pretending you're the adult here. 😆
  11. and you're a great judge of credibility, as you parrot Tucker Carlson at every turn. 🙄 The made-up ones that don't exist?
  12. Biological research facilities =/ bioweapon labs. Anyone who lives near a university lives near biological research facilities. He should ask Putin if this is baby is for sale: 🙄
  13. One other person replied, but nobody read your post.
  14. No, but that doesn't make this chart you buffoonishly posted any more relevant. w You're posting figures from the first two months of the pandemic, from the ground-zero states. Using updated numbers, this chart loses all validity. The Red States (even the sparsely populated ones) did a great job catching up to NY, NJ and CT, and in many cases surpassed them! Shout out to the Bubbas! Yes, it was a factor. It was one factor, among many. It does not explain why US COVID outcomes were so poor compared to the rest of the world, as you attempted. US COVID outcomes were terrible across the board, adjusted for population density, and there's an exhaustive list of the most densely populated countries in the world doing much better.
  15. Cave to naked aggression and wars of conquest. Obviously they can, because they've been doing it since 2022. This whole war has gone about as poorly for Putin as possible. Maybe not, but the Ukrainians already took back large swathes of territory before, didn't they? $60B of US aid being signed and on its way tomorrow. Like your bioweapon labs? 🤡
  16. If I did, surely you can provide a quote? Once again, you're just making stuff up and arguing with yourself. That's from April 30, 2020, you absolute clown.
  17. Nobody's discussing your OP. Nobody's going to read it. Even if people don't immediately dismiss the post just by its title and the reputation and tendencies of its author, they certainly will when that wall of text assaults their senses.
  18. Nope. That's just you making shit up, and arguing with yourself...again, LOL! I have no problem with the research you posted. The problem is in the buff conclusions you drew from it. No, the research shows a moderate correlation (in the US ~0.55), which is is unsurprising given how viruses spread from person to person. What it cannot explain is: 1) Why the worst performing states in the US are low density ones (like Arizona, Mississipi, West Virginia and New Mexico) 2) Why even States with lower population density to Canada performed significantly worse. 3) Why places in the world with 10x the population density of the USA had less than 50% of its population adjusted deaths. Once again, you've pooped your pants and proven how much of a clueless bullshitter you are.
  19. For reals? Diseases are more deadly in places with higher population density? Might as well tell us the sky is blue. Like...Alaska, with 2000 deaths per 100,000 (higher than Canada's ~1500) despite having 1/8th Canada's population density? Like...Wyoming, with half Canada's population density, but double the COVID deaths per 100,000? Once again, you've been caught cluelessly bullshitting. Way to humiliate yourself again.
  20. Yes, this goes for most taxes. Tax "arbitrage" for the wealthy, and for people in various different circumstances, is a dumb paradigm, but it's the one we live in. One of the reasons I don't like Canada's carbon pricing, and much of the green energy subsidies/requirements etc, is the same idea. In many cases, we fool ourselves into feeling good about what we're seemingly doing, but what's actually happening is companies are just moving to other countries where things are looser. In effect, we just export our pollution and bad business practices.
  21. Yes, this goes for most taxes. Tax "arbitrage" for the wealthy, and for people in various different circumstances, is a dumb paradigm, but it's the one we live in. One of the reasons I don't like Canada's carbon pricing, and much of the green energy shifts and subsidies, is because of this. In many cases it's a fool's game where our feel-good policies end up being an exportation of pollution to countries with different rules.
  22. Not just slash spending, but also hike taxes. The only reason we have the GST is because Trudeau Snr spent frivolously, and now his dope of a son is doing the same thing (but worse).
  23. Evidently it's not irrelevant, because the front line hasn't moved for 2 years, Ukraine is still standing, and the decrepit and incompetent Russian army has been utterly humiliated. 🙃
  24. Should have ever begun, but little Putin started it. Russian terms? If you're only concerned about Russian terms, then we're not really concerned about negotiation at all, but rather just caving.
  25. Two thoughts: 1) Canada isn't likely to send much of anything while the US is waffling. It'd be like trying to dump a sand bucket of rocks to fix a broken dam. Not worth doing unless the heavy lifters are committed as well. 2) We barely have anything to give. Yes, we have a few tanks, but until the Ukrainian airforce is reinforced and their ammo shortages backstopped, we'd be sending expensive (albeit old) equipment that isn't being properly supported. Beyond that, our military is crippled by decades of neglect, so our support is probably never going to amount to more than $$$ and a few tokens. Fortunately, the US Republicans aren't completely beholden to Orange Man and just passed $60B worth of Ukraine aid today...That's something. JT needs a swift kick in the acehole to start doing something meaningful. Don't worry though. All that money that could be spent rehabilitating our abused military will be well-spent on giving unnecessary public service jobs to immigrants we don't want or need. 😐👍
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