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On 9/14/2023 at 10:39 AM, BeaverFever said:

Report cites human factors in CC-150 collision in Guam

By Chris Thatcher | September 13, 2023

Estimated reading time 7 minutes, 39 seconds. 

Human factors may have been the cause of an accident at Andersen Air Force Base (AFB) in Guam between a CC-150 Polaris and a French Air Force A400M at the end of Exercise Mobility Guardian.

The Polaris, 150003, a strategic transport aircraft, had landed the day before, on July 21, to bring back equipment and personnel participating in the two-week multinational training event. The crew had flown from 8 Wing Trenton, Ont., through Hickam AFB in Hawaii, before touching down in Guam just before 21:45 local time.

The aircraft was parked in spot N24 by military ground crew involved in Ex Mobility Guardian, and was then loaded with equipment and baggage. According to a preliminary report by the Department of National Defence (DND) Airworthiness Investigative Authority, “the aircraft was partially secured (without chocks)” for the night.

Screen-Shot-2023-09-13-at-11.46.10-AM-10 The CC-150’s right horizontal and vertical stabilizer contacted the empennage of the French Air Force A400M (shown left). Photo by Capt Lehnart, 2 Ere SV

“At approximately 10:30 local the following morning, the aircraft began to roll backwards, nose veering to the left, and continued to roll until the right horizontal and vertical stabilizer contacted the empennage of a French Air Force A400M parked on spot N22. Following contact, the CC-150 rebounded forward coming to rest approximately eight metres from the point of impact,” the investigator found.

Both the Canadian and French aircraft “sustained serious damage,” according to the report, but no personnel were injured.

Since there was no evidence of technical issues with the CC-150, the investigation is now focused on “procedures, communications, and human factors.”

The Polaris remains in Guam and the Air Force is assessing whether the aircraft can be repaired or should be retired.

“As of now, the course of action for the aircraft in question is still being determined,” a DND spokesperson stated.

Exercise Mobility Guardian is a biennial training event hosted by the U.S. Air Force Air Mobility Command. Normally a North American exercise for U.S. and Canadian aircrews, in 2023 it was expanded to a multinational event for all the Five Eyes partners: Australia, New Zealand, and the United Kingdom, as well as France and Japan. Set in a scenario stretching across the Indo-Pacific, participants conducted air mobility training in support of other regional exercises, including transport and air drops, air-to-air refuelling, and aeromedical evacuation.

The Canadian Air Task Force included a tactical airlift detachment of two CC-130J Hercules and an air-to-air refuelling detachment of one CC-150T Polaris tanker, as well as the respective aircrews, operations personnel, and maintenance teams from 436 Transport Squadron and 437 Transport Squadron. It also contained an aeromedical evacuation team, an Expeditionary Air Traffic Management team from 8 Air Communications and Control Squadron, and a Mobile Air Movements Section.

The Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) is currently in the process of replacing the CC-150 Polaris fleet with nine Airbus A330-200 Multi Role Tanker Transport (MRTT) aircraft. The Canadian government on July 25 awarded a contract of about $3.6 billion to Airbus Defence and Space for the purchase of four new Airbus-built A330 MRTTs and the conversion of five used A330-200s to the MRTT configuration.

While the five CC-150 aircraft have a service life expectancy to 2027, some of the fleet may need to be replaced sooner. A CC-150 transporting Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and delegates to and from a G20 summit in India this week remains on the ground following the detection of a faulty part during the preflight check. A replacement part is being flown commercially to India by an Air Force technician.

20230722-cc150-img1.jpg The A400M (left) and the CC-150 Polaris seen on the tarmac in Guam after the incident. Photo by MSgt Haynes, 36 Wing FS, Andersen AFB, Guam

In October 2019, a CC-150 rolled into a hangar wall 8 Wing Trenton while being towed. The “structural damage to the nose and right engine cowling” was significant and the plane was out of service for 16 months.

Consequently, the Strategic Tanker Transport Capability (STTC) project has taken on some urgency.

The government acquired two A330-200 planes in July 2022 for US$102 million and then three more in July 2023 for US$150 million. The aircraft were all previously operated by Kuwait Airways and acquired through International AirFinance Corporation.

“The procurement of used aircraft for this capability is a viable option given that military rates of annual flight hour consumption are typically less than commercial rates,” the government stated. “Thus, a used commercial aircraft that has a modest number of hours flown on it can still achieve a full military service life of 30 years.”

The five used A330-200 aircraft will receive a “limited retrofit” to bring them to the standard of a new A300-200, and will be powered by the same Rolls-Royce Trent 700 engines as the four additional Airbus-built aircraft.

Eight of the nine aircraft, to be called the CC-330 Husky, will adopt operational grey livery and be converted to the full MRTT mission suite of troop and cargo transport, aeromedical evacuation, and air-to-air refuelling – with both boom and hose and drogue systems.

However, the first one, 330002, which landed at Ottawa International Airport on Aug. 31, is painted in the white Canadian government livery and will be assigned secure transport of government officials.

https://skiesmag.com/news/report-cites-human-factors-cc-150-polaris-collision-guam/?utm_source=skies-daily-news-top-story&utm_campaign=skies-daily-news&utm_medium=email&utm_term=top-story&utm_content=V1

It’s official the damaged Polaris in Guam will be written off and scrapped, totally unsurprising now that the new Huskies are being delivered 

 

Air Force plane to be completely scrapped after collision with French aircraft

Fixing the CC-150 Polaris that collided with a French air force plane at Anderson Air Force Base in July would cost as much as $28 million

Published Dec 01, 2023  •  Last updated 20 hours ago  •  3 minute read

 

The end result of a Canadian CC -150 Polaris that rolled away and collided with a parked French Air Force A400M on July 22, 2023 at Anderson Air Force Base in Guam. The Canadian aircraft will be scrapped.The end result of a Canadian CC -150 Polaris that rolled away and collided with a parked French Air Force A400M on July 22, 2023 at Anderson Air Force Base in Guam. The Canadian aircraft will be scrapped. Courtesy United States Air Force

OTTAWA – Marooned at a Micronesian air force base after colliding with another aircraft over the summer, a heavily damaged Canadian Air Force transport plane will be scrapped, officials say.

Royal Canadian Air Force transport plane 15003 — a CC-150 Polaris — was involved in a ground collision with a French Air Force plane on July 22 at Anderson Air Force Base in Guam while participating in a multinational exercise organized by the United States Air Force.

With the fate of the aircraft left in doubt since the summer, the Royal Canadian Air Force confirmed to the National Post on Thursday the plane will be written off and scrapped on site.

“The Polaris CC-150 aircraft in question sustained severe damage that renders repair economically unfeasible,” said Department of National Defence Spokesperson Maj. Soomin Kim.

“Repair costs were estimated to range between $7.9 and $28.5 million, with a six to eight-month turnaround period.”

According to an official air force occurrence summary, 15003 was taking part in Exercise MOBILITY GUARDIAN, a large-scale logistics training exercise facilitated by the USAF Air Mobility Command.

An RCAF crew assigned to fly the plane back to CFB Trenton arrived at Hickam Air Force Base in Hawaii on July 21, the report read, with plans to depart Guam the next day for Canada.

“The aircraft was loaded with equipment and baggage in preparation for departure the following day,” the report read.

Noting the plane was left “partially secured” without wheel chocks, the report said 15003 rolled backwards on its own at 10:30 a.m. the next morning, colliding with a French Air Force Airbus A400M parked nearby.

“Following contact the CC-150 rebounded forward, coming to rest approximately eight meters from the point of impact,” the report read.

 

The end result of a Canadian CC -150 Polaris that rolled away and collided with a parked French Air Force A400M on July 22, 2023 at Anderson Air Force Base in Guam. The Canadian aircraft will be scrapped.The end result of a Canadian CC -150 Polaris that rolled away and collided with a parked French Air Force A400M on July 22, 2023 at Anderson Air Force Base in Guam. The Canadian aircraft will be scrapped.Photo by United States Air Force photo

The French aircraft’s horizontal stabilizer tore through 15003’s rudder, nearly shearing off the plane’s tail.

Both planes sustained major damage in the collision, the report noted, but nobody was injured.

“The investigation did not reveal any evidence of technical issues with the aircraft and is now focusing on procedures, communications, and human factors,” the report stated.

The decision to scrap 15003 came just one day before the plane was scheduled to be decommissioned, Kim said, now that the first of four new Airbus-built CC-330 Husky Multi-Role Tanker Transport (MRTT) planes entered service earlier this month.

The CC-330s are based on Airbus’s venerable A330-200 airliners.

Those four planes are part of a $3.6-billion deal to modernize Canada’s transport, VIP and air-to-air refuelling capabilities.

Canada’s first CC-330 arrived in Canada in October and took its first official flight earlier this month, transporting Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to the APEC summit in San Francisco.

“The Canadian Armed Forces concluded that writing off the aircraft would be in the best interest of the Crown,” Maj. Kim said.

The arrival of the CC-330 Husky couldn’t have come at a better time for Canada’s beleaguered and obsolete Polaris fleet.

Plane 15001, typically used by the prime minister or other VIPs for overseas trips, broke down in September in New Delhi, prompting an international mission to both dispatch technicians and a second planeto India to rescue the PM and his delegation.

In 2019, that same plane was put out of commission for nearly a year-and-a-half after it rolled away and collided with a hangar wall at CFB Trenton, causing $11 million in damage to its nose and an engine. 

Ottawa-based research consultant Steffan Watkins pointed out that most of that repair time was spent waiting for an open repair slot at the Airbus maintenance depot at Montreal-Mirabel airport.

“It would be interesting to know, in the government’s expected schedule for the estimated work needed to fix 15003, if most of the time for the repair would be spent waiting for Airbus to slot them in,” he said.

Aircraft 15004, he said, has been undergoing deep maintenance in Mirabel for the past month.

Only three of the RCAF’s five Polaris planes are still in service — 15001 and 15002 have spent the past two weeks performing flights between Canada and Europe, with 15005 taking part in a joint training exercise in Key West, Fla.

 

https://www.coldlakesun.com/news/rcaf-plane-collision-guam-scrapped

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  • 2 weeks later...

RCN's fifth AOPS HMCS Frédérick Rolette has officially launched

RCN's fifth AOPS HMCS Frédérick Rolette has officially launched
 

The Royal Canadian Navy’s fifth Arctic and Offshore Patrol Ship (AOPS), the future HMCS Frédérick Rolette, was launched on December 9, 2023, at Halifax Shipyard.

The launch of the fifth of six AOPS for the Royal Canadian Navy, marks a significant milestone for Canada’s National Shipbuilding Strategy (NSS) and the revitalization of the Royal Canadian Navy’s combatant fleet.

A full two months ahead of schedule, the 103-metre future HMCS Frédérick Rolette transitioned from Halifax Shipyard’s land level facility to a submersible barge on December 8th and launched in the Bedford Basin on December 9th. 

 

The ship, constructed by over 2,400 shipbuilders, is now pier side at Halifax Shipyard where work continues in preparation for sea trials and handover to the Royal Canadian Navy in September 2024.

Inside Halifax Shipyard’s facilities, the Royal Canadian Navy’s sixth AOPS, the future HMCS Robert Hampton Gray and the first AOPS variant for the Canadian Coast Guard are under construction, with work progressing as planned.

A generation of shipbuilders will deliver six AOPS for the Royal Canadian Navy, two AOPS for the Canadian Coast Guard, and 15 Canadian Surface Combatant ships for the Royal Canadian Navy as part of the NSS.

“The launch of future HMCS Frédérick Rolette is another milestone achieved on our mission to deliver ships for Canada,” said Dirk Lesko, President, Irving Shipbuilding Inc. “I’m proud of the teamwork that delivered this result”.

http://www.canadiandefencereview.com/UserFiles/Image/2023_images/0U1A5497%20-%20WEB.jpgCharles Frédérick Rolette was born in Québec City on September 23, 1785, and joined the Royal Navy as a midshipman while a young teen. He distinguished himself during the War of 1812, earning a reputation as a bold and quick-thinking officer. The historical Canton of Rolette, located on the south shore of the St. Lawrence River, roughly 50 km southeast of the town of Montmagny, Québec, near the American border, was established in 1868 in his honour.

Just before the outbreak of the War of 1812, Rolette was posted to Amherstburg, Upper Canada (now Ontario) as Lieutenant in command of the brig General Hunter. When word of the outbreak of war reached Amherstburg on July 3, 1812, Rolette acted immediately, capturing an American vessel, the Cuyahoga, before the American crew even realized that their country had declared war on Britain. This was the first action of the War of 1812 and a significant prize as the Cuyahoga carried the American commander General William Hull’s papers and dispatches. This provided the British with significant early intelligence on American strength and deployment.

At a time when it was not yet customary to award medals to military personnel in recognition of conspicuous gallantry, Lieutenant Rolette was mentioned in dispatches by senior military officers on several occasions during the war. At the capture of Detroit, Major-General Isaac Brock praised Rolette’s conduct in the highest terms: “I have watched you during the action,” said the general, “you behaved like a lion, and I will remember you.”

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Canada sending Griffon, Chinook helicopters to Latvia

By Skies Magazine | December 15, 2023

Estimated reading time 2 minutes, 46 seconds. 

Ch-146-griffon-1024x791.jpg The CH-146 Griffon is based on the Bell 412EP. Mike Reyno Photo

Canada will send four CH-146 Griffon helicopters to Latvia and will periodically deploy CH-147F Chinooks there starting in the fall of 2025, as part of an expanded NATO mission.

This marks the first time Canada has persistently deployed tactical aviation capabilities to Europe since the conflicts in Bosnia and Kosovo in the late 1990s and early 2000s, according to the Department of National Defence.

“Through our deployment in Latvia — the largest current Canadian military deployment abroad — Canada is making a meaningful contribution to Euro-Atlantic security,” said Canadian defence minister Bill Blair in a statement.

The Griffon helicopters will be assigned to the Canadian-led NATO enhanced Forward Presence (eFP) Battle Group, as part of Operation REASSURANCE. 

ch147-chinook-1024x684.jpg CH-147F Chinook helicopters will be periodically deployed to Latvia as part of Canada’s operations there. Mike Reyno Photo

They are part of a renewed effort that will more than double Canada’s presence in the operation, from about 1,000 troops to 2,200 persistently deployed troops by 2026.

“The additional measures that I announced today will significantly increase the capabilities of the Canadian-led, multinational battle group in Latvia, further boosting NATO’s defence and deterrence posture,” said Blair.

The NATO eFP Battle group is composed of Canada and nine other countries: Albania, Czechia, Italy, Montenegro, North Macedonia, Poland, Slovakia, Slovenia, and Spain.

Canada is also sending 15 Leopard 2A4M tanks to Latvia, and procuring portable anti-armor missile systems, as well as medium-range radar capabilities, along with C$15 million in new infrastructure needed to scale up the existing battle brigade.
 

https://skiesmag.com/news/canada-sending-griffon-chinook-helicopters-to-latvia/?utm_source=skies-daily-news-todays-news&utm_campaign=skies-daily-news&utm_medium=email&utm_term=todays-news&utm_content=V1
 

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5 hours ago, BeaverFever said:

Canada sending Griffon, Chinook helicopters to Latvia

By Skies Magazine | December 15, 2023

Estimated reading time 2 minutes, 46 seconds. 

Ch-146-griffon-1024x791.jpg The CH-146 Griffon is based on the Bell 412EP. Mike Reyno Photo

Canada will send four CH-146 Griffon helicopters to Latvia and will periodically deploy CH-147F Chinooks there starting in the fall of 2025, as part of an expanded NATO mission.

This marks the first time Canada has persistently deployed tactical aviation capabilities to Europe since the conflicts in Bosnia and Kosovo in the late 1990s and early 2000s, according to the Department of National Defence.

“Through our deployment in Latvia — the largest current Canadian military deployment abroad — Canada is making a meaningful contribution to Euro-Atlantic security,” said Canadian defence minister Bill Blair in a statement.

The Griffon helicopters will be assigned to the Canadian-led NATO enhanced Forward Presence (eFP) Battle Group, as part of Operation REASSURANCE. 

ch147-chinook-1024x684.jpg CH-147F Chinook helicopters will be periodically deployed to Latvia as part of Canada’s operations there. Mike Reyno Photo

They are part of a renewed effort that will more than double Canada’s presence in the operation, from about 1,000 troops to 2,200 persistently deployed troops by 2026.

“The additional measures that I announced today will significantly increase the capabilities of the Canadian-led, multinational battle group in Latvia, further boosting NATO’s defence and deterrence posture,” said Blair.

The NATO eFP Battle group is composed of Canada and nine other countries: Albania, Czechia, Italy, Montenegro, North Macedonia, Poland, Slovakia, Slovenia, and Spain.

Canada is also sending 15 Leopard 2A4M tanks to Latvia, and procuring portable anti-armor missile systems, as well as medium-range radar capabilities, along with C$15 million in new infrastructure needed to scale up the existing battle brigade.
 

https://skiesmag.com/news/canada-sending-griffon-chinook-helicopters-to-latvia/?utm_source=skies-daily-news-todays-news&utm_campaign=skies-daily-news&utm_medium=email&utm_term=todays-news&utm_content=V1
 

Buried in the news coverage of this topic is this little gem:


 

  • Canada has finalized the procurement of Portable Anti-Armour Missile Systems for our forces in Latvia, including missiles, simulators, and associated supports. These modern anti-tank weapons will better equip our soldiers to confront threats from our adversaries’ main battle tanks, thus strengthening NATO’s deterrence posture. These weapons are being procured on an urgent basis after having been designated an Urgent Operational Requirement. Canada has awarded the Portable Anti "X" Missile (PAXM) on behalf of the Department of National Defence to Rafael Advanced Defense Systems for $32.2M USD. The first of these systems is expected to arrive by mid-2024.

 

So Rafael is the maker of the widely admired and highly capable Euro-Israeli Spike anti-tank guided missile system.   Not much about this is out right now but I expect we will hear more details in coming days. 
 


 

Edited by BeaverFever
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On 12/11/2023 at 7:22 PM, BeaverFever said:

The launch of the fifth of six AOPS for the Royal Canadian Navy, marks a significant milestone for Canada’s National Shipbuilding Strategy (NSS) and the revitalization of the Royal Canadian Navy’s combatant fleet.

It's not a combatant. And from what I'm hearing the RCN doesn't have enough crew for these things anyway.

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On 12/11/2023 at 4:22 PM, BeaverFever said:

RCN's fifth AOPS HMCS Frédérick Rolette has officially launched

RCN's fifth AOPS HMCS Frédérick Rolette has officially launched
 

The Royal Canadian Navy’s fifth Arctic and Offshore Patrol Ship (AOPS), the future HMCS Frédérick Rolette, was launched on December 9, 2023, at Halifax Shipyard.

The launch of the fifth of six AOPS for the Royal Canadian Navy, marks a significant milestone for Canada’s National Shipbuilding Strategy (NSS) and the revitalization of the Royal Canadian Navy’s combatant fleet.

A full two months ahead of schedule, the 103-metre future HMCS Frédérick Rolette transitioned from Halifax Shipyard’s land level facility to a submersible barge on December 8th and launched in the Bedford Basin on December 9th. 

 

The ship, constructed by over 2,400 shipbuilders, is now pier side at Halifax Shipyard where work continues in preparation for sea trials and handover to the Royal Canadian Navy in September 2024.

Inside Halifax Shipyard’s facilities, the Royal Canadian Navy’s sixth AOPS, the future HMCS Robert Hampton Gray and the first AOPS variant for the Canadian Coast Guard are under construction, with work progressing as planned.

A generation of shipbuilders will deliver six AOPS for the Royal Canadian Navy, two AOPS for the Canadian Coast Guard, and 15 Canadian Surface Combatant ships for the Royal Canadian Navy as part of the NSS.

“The launch of future HMCS Frédérick Rolette is another milestone achieved on our mission to deliver ships for Canada,” said Dirk Lesko, President, Irving Shipbuilding Inc. “I’m proud of the teamwork that delivered this result”.

http://www.canadiandefencereview.com/UserFiles/Image/2023_images/0U1A5497 - WEB.jpgCharles Frédérick Rolette was born in Québec City on September 23, 1785, and joined the Royal Navy as a midshipman while a young teen. He distinguished himself during the War of 1812, earning a reputation as a bold and quick-thinking officer. The historical Canton of Rolette, located on the south shore of the St. Lawrence River, roughly 50 km southeast of the town of Montmagny, Québec, near the American border, was established in 1868 in his honour.

Just before the outbreak of the War of 1812, Rolette was posted to Amherstburg, Upper Canada (now Ontario) as Lieutenant in command of the brig General Hunter. When word of the outbreak of war reached Amherstburg on July 3, 1812, Rolette acted immediately, capturing an American vessel, the Cuyahoga, before the American crew even realized that their country had declared war on Britain. This was the first action of the War of 1812 and a significant prize as the Cuyahoga carried the American commander General William Hull’s papers and dispatches. This provided the British with significant early intelligence on American strength and deployment.

At a time when it was not yet customary to award medals to military personnel in recognition of conspicuous gallantry, Lieutenant Rolette was mentioned in dispatches by senior military officers on several occasions during the war. At the capture of Detroit, Major-General Isaac Brock praised Rolette’s conduct in the highest terms: “I have watched you during the action,” said the general, “you behaved like a lion, and I will remember you.”

With only a 25MM Bushmaster for a main armament, it is a stretch to call these things combatants. More like glorified police boats.

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On 12/2/2023 at 7:07 AM, BeaverFever said:

It’s official the damaged Polaris in Guam will be written off and scrapped, totally unsurprising now that the new Huskies are being delivered 

 

Air Force plane to be completely scrapped after collision with French aircraft

Fixing the CC-150 Polaris that collided with a French air force plane at Anderson Air Force Base in July would cost as much as $28 million

Published Dec 01, 2023  •  Last updated 20 hours ago  •  3 minute read

The end result of a Canadian CC -150 Polaris that rolled away and collided with a parked French Air Force A400M on July 22, 2023 at Anderson Air Force Base in Guam. The Canadian aircraft will be scrapped.The end result of a Canadian CC -150 Polaris that rolled away and collided with a parked French Air Force A400M on July 22, 2023 at Anderson Air Force Base in Guam. The Canadian aircraft will be scrapped. Courtesy United States Air Force

OTTAWA – Marooned at a Micronesian air force base after colliding with another aircraft over the summer, a heavily damaged Canadian Air Force transport plane will be scrapped, officials say.

Royal Canadian Air Force transport plane 15003 — a CC-150 Polaris — was involved in a ground collision with a French Air Force plane on July 22 at Anderson Air Force Base in Guam while participating in a multinational exercise organized by the United States Air Force.

With the fate of the aircraft left in doubt since the summer, the Royal Canadian Air Force confirmed to the National Post on Thursday the plane will be written off and scrapped on site.

“The Polaris CC-150 aircraft in question sustained severe damage that renders repair economically unfeasible,” said Department of National Defence Spokesperson Maj. Soomin Kim.

“Repair costs were estimated to range between $7.9 and $28.5 million, with a six to eight-month turnaround period.”

According to an official air force occurrence summary, 15003 was taking part in Exercise MOBILITY GUARDIAN, a large-scale logistics training exercise facilitated by the USAF Air Mobility Command.

An RCAF crew assigned to fly the plane back to CFB Trenton arrived at Hickam Air Force Base in Hawaii on July 21, the report read, with plans to depart Guam the next day for Canada.

“The aircraft was loaded with equipment and baggage in preparation for departure the following day,” the report read.

Noting the plane was left “partially secured” without wheel chocks, the report said 15003 rolled backwards on its own at 10:30 a.m. the next morning, colliding with a French Air Force Airbus A400M parked nearby.

“Following contact the CC-150 rebounded forward, coming to rest approximately eight meters from the point of impact,” the report read.

 

The end result of a Canadian CC -150 Polaris that rolled away and collided with a parked French Air Force A400M on July 22, 2023 at Anderson Air Force Base in Guam. The Canadian aircraft will be scrapped.The end result of a Canadian CC -150 Polaris that rolled away and collided with a parked French Air Force A400M on July 22, 2023 at Anderson Air Force Base in Guam. The Canadian aircraft will be scrapped.Photo by United States Air Force photo

The French aircraft’s horizontal stabilizer tore through 15003’s rudder, nearly shearing off the plane’s tail.

Both planes sustained major damage in the collision, the report noted, but nobody was injured.

“The investigation did not reveal any evidence of technical issues with the aircraft and is now focusing on procedures, communications, and human factors,” the report stated.

The decision to scrap 15003 came just one day before the plane was scheduled to be decommissioned, Kim said, now that the first of four new Airbus-built CC-330 Husky Multi-Role Tanker Transport (MRTT) planes entered service earlier this month.

The CC-330s are based on Airbus’s venerable A330-200 airliners.

Those four planes are part of a $3.6-billion deal to modernize Canada’s transport, VIP and air-to-air refuelling capabilities.

Canada’s first CC-330 arrived in Canada in October and took its first official flight earlier this month, transporting Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to the APEC summit in San Francisco.

“The Canadian Armed Forces concluded that writing off the aircraft would be in the best interest of the Crown,” Maj. Kim said.

The arrival of the CC-330 Husky couldn’t have come at a better time for Canada’s beleaguered and obsolete Polaris fleet.

Plane 15001, typically used by the prime minister or other VIPs for overseas trips, broke down in September in New Delhi, prompting an international mission to both dispatch technicians and a second planeto India to rescue the PM and his delegation.

In 2019, that same plane was put out of commission for nearly a year-and-a-half after it rolled away and collided with a hangar wall at CFB Trenton, causing $11 million in damage to its nose and an engine. 

Ottawa-based research consultant Steffan Watkins pointed out that most of that repair time was spent waiting for an open repair slot at the Airbus maintenance depot at Montreal-Mirabel airport.

“It would be interesting to know, in the government’s expected schedule for the estimated work needed to fix 15003, if most of the time for the repair would be spent waiting for Airbus to slot them in,” he said.

Aircraft 15004, he said, has been undergoing deep maintenance in Mirabel for the past month.

Only three of the RCAF’s five Polaris planes are still in service — 15001 and 15002 have spent the past two weeks performing flights between Canada and Europe, with 15005 taking part in a joint training exercise in Key West, Fla.

 

https://www.coldlakesun.com/news/rcaf-plane-collision-guam-scrapped

The Polaris (A310) was one of the first airliners with a composite vertical stabilizer. It also has a "wet" (carries fuel) horizontal stabilizer. Not just simple sheet metal repairs.

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On 12/16/2023 at 10:40 AM, I am Groot said:

It's not a combatant. And from what I'm hearing the RCN doesn't have enough crew for these things anyway.

I had the same thoughts. I can’t find any other examples of DND/CAF referring to the AOPS as a combatant  so I assume this is some sort of attempt to conflate progress on the AOPS with the much delayed Canadian Surface Combatant program which is a different NSS program. On the second point, as the RCNs top commander recently announced they only have enough personnel to crew one AOPS at a time. 

22 hours ago, Aristides said:

The Polaris (A310) was one of the first airliners with a composite vertical stabilizer. It also has a "wet" (carries fuel) horizontal stabilizer. Not just simple sheet metal repairs.

Interesting! I didn’t know that!

Edited by BeaverFever
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On 12/15/2023 at 7:37 PM, BeaverFever said:

Buried in the news coverage of this topic is this little gem:


 

  • Canada has finalized the procurement of Portable Anti-Armour Missile Systems for our forces in Latvia, including missiles, simulators, and associated supports. These modern anti-tank weapons will better equip our soldiers to confront threats from our adversaries’ main battle tanks, thus strengthening NATO’s deterrence posture. These weapons are being procured on an urgent basis after having been designated an Urgent Operational Requirement. Canada has awarded the Portable Anti "X" Missile (PAXM) on behalf of the Department of National Defence to Rafael Advanced Defense Systems for $32.2M USD. The first of these systems is expected to arrive by mid-2024.

 

So Rafael is the maker of the widely admired and highly capable Euro-Israeli Spike anti-tank guided missile system.   Not much about this is out right now but I expect we will hear more details in coming days. 
 


 

The sale does not say if it is just for our forces deployed, or if this system is going to be a forces wide sale...this trick was used in Afghanistan many times, only spend what you have to...has always been the feds moto...that being said i'd be curious to find out how many system it includes...it would need to be in the thousands to make it a forces wide system...

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On 12/16/2023 at 11:40 AM, I am Groot said:

It's not a combatant. And from what I'm hearing the RCN doesn't have enough crew for these things anyway.

From what i heard from Navy guys is mixed feelings, some say they take anything that was new...others say it is nothing more than an armed coast guard ves, that adds no value to most naval missions...It was a conservative distraction...when we were going to build new FOB's in the north and get serious about protecting our sovereignty...DND gave that mission to the reserves, who has not been equipped for the job, nor did we train them to that capability...It was DND attempt to show Canadians they really care about doing there jobs...yes i was being sarcastic

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1 minute ago, Army Guy said:

The sale does not say if it is just for our forces deployed, or if this system is going to be a forces wide sale...this trick was used in Afghanistan many times, only spend what you have to...has always been the feds moto...that being said i'd be curious to find out how many system it includes...it would need to be in the thousands to make it a forces wide system...

Im pretty certain its just for Latvia for now. But in the latest Army podcast it was mentioned that because the Latvia battle group is scaling up to brigade size, large increases in quantity of existing Urgent Operational Requirement requests for PAXM, MANPAD/SHORAD, anti-drone, etc were all approved. So that’s all we’ve got to hang our hopes on right now. 

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4 minutes ago, BeaverFever said:

Im pretty certain its just for Latvia for now. But in the latest Army podcast it was mentioned that because the Latvia battle group is scaling up to brigade size, large increases in quantity of existing Urgent Operational Requirement requests for PAXM, MANPAD/SHORAD, anti-drone, etc were all approved. So that’s all we’ve got to hang our hopes on right now. 

In Canada's current state, we will never be able to deploy more than a battle group...even at the height of Afghanistan we could barely maintain a full brigade deployed...doing it now with up to 20% less men and old equipment is asking to much...The Brigade group numbers for the most part will have to come from another country...

Yes we are slowly investing in our troops that are deployed, which to be honest represents a very small amount of people we have in the forces.......we have deployed them to act as a triggers for NATO...but we are asking them to do that without any of the vital equipment they need...it is like we watch the Ukraine war every night we take notes , but we don't want to spend any on basic upgrades, to give them a fighting chance...because it is cheaper to bury our troops than it is to equip them...These are some very basic needs you have listed and the military has gone without them for decades....these purchases should have been approved on the outset of approving the mission to Latvia...but they weren't even thought of... 

Sorry for the rant, but this is a reflection on how this nation really does not give a rats ass about our people in uniform...and then we wonder why we can't get more younger Canadians to serve...

If we can't equip them bring them home...

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1 hour ago, Army Guy said:

In Canada's current state, we will never be able to deploy more than a battle group...even at the height of Afghanistan we could barely maintain a full brigade deployed...doing it now with up to 20% less men and old equipment is asking to much...The Brigade group numbers for the most part will have to come from another country...

Yes we are slowly investing in our troops that are deployed, which to be honest represents a very small amount of people we have in the forces.......we have deployed them to act as a triggers for NATO...but we are asking them to do that without any of the vital equipment they need...it is like we watch the Ukraine war every night we take notes , but we don't want to spend any on basic upgrades, to give them a fighting chance...because it is cheaper to bury our troops than it is to equip them...These are some very basic needs you have listed and the military has gone without them for decades....these purchases should have been approved on the outset of approving the mission to Latvia...but they weren't even thought of... 

Sorry for the rant, but this is a reflection on how this nation really does not give a rats ass about our people in uniform...and then we wonder why we can't get more younger Canadians to serve...

If we can't equip them bring them home...

Yep no argument. It is definitely a multinational brigade, led by Canada   I don’t know what the target size is but I imagine it will be something like 4500-5000 with Canada being the largest contributor supplying 2200 plus occasionally surging in an additional light infantry battalion for periodic 6-8 week deployments. . 

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On 11/23/2023 at 2:20 PM, BeaverFever said:

Canada delays $3.6 billion Reaper buy until drones can work in Arctic

David PuglieseNov 23 at 10:14 AM

 

FFSQ5ELDKJHZ5L7HKERO726DWA.jpg

VICTORIA, British Columbia - The Canadian military’s acquisition of medium altitude armed drones is being delayed to allow for more development work to enable the aircraft to operate in the Arctic region.

The Remotely Piloted Aircraft System project was to deliver a fleet of drones for the Royal Canadian Air Force that would be operational by 2025. That date has now shifted and the delivery of the first aircraft is expected in 2028.

“The Canadian RPAS configuration will require significant development work in order to address RCAF requirements, which differ from our allies’ requirements,” said Department of National Defence spokesperson Andrée-Anne Poulin told Defense News.

Ottawa is focused on acquiring the General Atomics MQ-9B Reaper in a project budgeted with as much as 5 billion Canadian dollars ($3.6 billion). It’s hoping to have a contract in place by the end of this year or early next year.

The developmental work would require the integration of new systems on the MQ-9B, Poulin said in an email.

“For example, the need to operate at high northern latitudes, including in the Arctic, requires the use of satellites and aircraft antennas and communication components not previously integrated on the MQ-9,” she said. “Similarly, additional testing and qualification work will be required to ensure the RPAS can be operated and maintained in Canadian climatic conditions.”

Poulin said there is also some developmental effort required to integrate the Canadian-made WESCAM MX-20 EO/IR sensor onto the platform.

“Other examples include work required to develop a training solution tailored to RCAF requirements, and airworthiness certification required to support the RCAF concept of operations,” Poulin added.

Mark Brinkley, a spokesman for General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, declined to comment.

In September the U.S. State Department approved a potential Foreign Military Sale to Canada for 219 Hellfire missiles and other weapons and radars to be used by the MQ-9B. The proposed sale is worth an estimated $313 million.

Department of National Defence spokesman Andrew McKelvey said that FMS proposal was developed based on the current planned timelines for the RPAS project. The equipment and weapons expected to be provided through the FMS case will be delivered as and when required to support the RPAS integration, testing and production work that will be performed by General Atomics, he added.

 

https://www.defensenews.com/unmanned/2023/11/23/canada-delays-36-billion-reaper-buy-until-drones-can-work-in-arctic/

Well that sure wasn’t much of a delay!  As was previously pointed out, MQ-9 is old tech I wonder how long it will stay relevant 

 

Oh and we also gotta change that name. “Reaper” is just awful, especially considering the drone’s track record of indiscriminately killing civilians. I mean why not just call it the “mass murderer” or “Jack the Ripper”?  Unfortunately it was named by Americans at a time when they were especially hate-filled, sadistic and bloodthirsty after 9/11.

And are we still getting the Hellfires or not?  The article implies that we are but doesn’t make it explicitly clear  

————
Canadian military buying armed drones for $2.49B

Armed Forces purchasing 11 MQ-9 Reaper drones, delivery expected in 2028

Murray Brewster · CBC News · Posted: Dec 19, 2023 1:12 PM EST | Last Updated: 5 hours ago
An armed drone taxis down a runway.

In this image released by the U.S. Air Force, a fully armed MQ-9 Reaper unmanned aerial vehicle taxis down the runway at an air base in Afghanistan on Nov. 4, 2007. (Staff Sgt. Brian Ferguson/The Associated Press)

After more than two decades of debate, discussion and policy dissection, Canada's air force finally has the green light to acquire armed drones.

A fleet of 11 MQ-9B Reaper drones, built by U.S. defence contractor General Atomics, will be purchased in a $2.49 billion package, Liberal MPs announced Tuesday on behalf of Defence Minister Bill Blair.

As CBC News reported in October, delivery of the remotely piloted aircraft won't take place until 2028 and the air force doesn't expect to have the full fleet up and running until 2033.

Unlike other recent purchases for the air force, this project was announced outside of Ottawa in a low-key manner. 

The announcement came after Parliament adjourned for the holiday season and on the same day the Liberal government delivered more information about its high-profile electric vehicle program.

The Reapers will be delivered through a direct contract with the U.S. manufacturer, with some components — such as weapons and other technology — purchased under the framework of U.S. foreign military sales.

The drone program has followed a long and winding path through the federal bureaucracy.

The fact that Canada had chosen the MQ-9 slipped out back in the fall, when it was revealed that the U.S. had approved the sale of equipment related to the Reaper, including Hellfire missiles.

Drones were first proposed in the early 2000s and Canada came close to buying an earlier version of the Reaper (the Predator) under the former Conservative government. The program made its way into the 2017 Liberal defence policy, but has been the subject of internal review.

Two companies bid on the contract but one dropped out, leaving only General Atomics.

The federal government originally planned to acquire the MQ-9B Reaper fleet by by 2025.

As CBC News reported a few weeks ago, delivery and deployment have been delayed by uncertainty about how the MQ-9 Reapers will perform in the Arctic. Although the drones have proved themselves in other difficult climates, the Department of National Defence says they'll need to be modified to withstand the harsh Arctic environment and to include Canadian-made electronic surveillance equipment.

The contract involves the delivery of both the drones and six ground stations. The main ground control centre, which houses the aircraft cockpits, will be situated in Ottawa.

Drone pilots sit in a remote cockpit.
A student pilot and sensor operator man the controls of a MQ-9 Reaper in a ground-based cockpit during a training mission at Hancock Field Air National Guard Base, Syracuse, New York on June 6, 2012. (TSgt Ricky Best/The Associated Press)

The aircraft themselves will be stationed at the military airbases in Greenwood, Nova Scotia and Comox, B.C. Their purchase will require the construction of new hangars.

"The Government of Canada is committed to providing the Canadian Armed Forces with the equipment they need to keep Canadians safe," Blair said in a statement.

"This agreement to acquire the Remotely Piloted Aircraft System will expand Canada's ability to modernize its military force, contribute to joint intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance operations with its allies, and create good jobs in the aerospace and defence sector."

Background material, released as part of the announcement, says General Atomics has agreed to deliver economic benefit commitments to Canada as part of the acquisition — investments that have the potential to generate close to 700 jobs annually.

A man in a military uniform gestures as he speaks.
Vice-Admiral Bob Auchterlonie speaks during an interview in Ottawa on Wednesday, December 14, 2022. (Patrick Doyle/The Canadian Press)

In a year-end interview with CBC News, conducted prior to Tuesday's announcement, the military's operations commander Vice-Admiral Bob Auchterlonie said the acquisition of drones is crucial, especially for overseas missions such as the deployment of a Canadian brigade in Latvia.

Auchterlonie said that as the operations commander, he "would rather have capability now than than later on." He said he understood the challenges the air force faces as it introduces multiple new fleets of aircraft, such as the F-35 fighters, the P-8 Poseidon surveillance plane and new air-to-air refuelling planes.

The U.S., the U.K., Italy, France and Spain have all acquired the MQ-9 Reaper, but the amount of time Canada's version will spend in the Far North is a matter of concern.

The need to operate at high northern latitudes and the Arctic requires the use of satellites, aircraft antennas and communication components not previously integrated into the MQ-9B, the defence department has said.

The manufacturer insists the aircraft has proved itself in the High Arctic.

In an online promotional pitch, General Atomics said the MQ-9B "operates well in cold weather conditions" and the airframe has a state-of-the-art anti-ice/de-icing system. In September 2021, the company conducted a demonstration flight to the 78th parallel in Canada's Far North.

 

https://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/armed-drone-canadian-armed-forces-1.7063989

Edited by BeaverFever
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On 12/17/2023 at 11:15 AM, Army Guy said:

From what i heard from Navy guys is mixed feelings, some say they take anything that was new...others say it is nothing more than an armed coast guard ves, that adds no value to most naval missions...It was a conservative distraction...when we were going to build new FOB's in the north and get serious about protecting our sovereignty...DND gave that mission to the reserves, who has not been equipped for the job, nor did we train them to that capability...It was DND attempt to show Canadians they really care about doing there jobs...yes i was being sarcastic

At least Norway's Svalbard class, 57MM gun and Denmark's Knud Rasmussen class,  76 MM gun (both equipped to carry Sea Sparrow missiles), will be able to help Canada's glorified police boats out. Good to have NATO partners.

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1 hour ago, Aristides said:

 

With a 1000 NM range, unless they can carry a lot external fuel they will have a tough time even reaching the Arctic from Comox and Greenwood.

I imagine that for arctic missions they’ll have to first deploy one of the 4 northern forward operating fighter bases which are Yellowknife, Inuvik, Rankin Inlet and Iqaluit.  At any rate this -B variant has more range-endurance than the traditional MQ-9A Reaper. I couldn’t fin the range but unarmed apparently endurance increases from 30hrs to 40

As an update to my earlier post, the MQ-9B is actually named the “SkyGuardian” by the manufacturer  Better but not perfect  

 

https://www.ga-asi.com/teamskyguardiancanada/#mq9bskyguardian?id=teamskyguardiancanada-mq-9b

 

At any rate by the time Canada jas them operational they will be completely obsolete for near-peer conflicts (they practically are already) and probably already retired by a number of our allies

Edited by BeaverFever
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40 hrs endurance would make it possible but at the Reaper's cruise speed it would take a good 7 hrs to get from Greenwood or Comox to the arctic coast and 14 hours to Alert. So 28 hours transit time to and from Alert and 12 hrs loiter time, landing back at their base with empty tanks unless the 6000 nm range given in Wiki includes some sort of reserves.

Hellfire missiles would also make it a lot more potent than a DeWolf with its pop gun.

Not bad really.

Edited by Aristides
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On 12/17/2023 at 2:34 PM, Army Guy said:

In Canada's current state, we will never be able to deploy more than a battle group...even at the height of Afghanistan we could barely maintain a full brigade deployed...doing it now with up to 20% less men and old equipment is asking to much...The Brigade group numbers for the most part will have to come from another country...

....

If we can't equip them bring them home...

Help a poor Air Force guy out.

You have spoken many times of a "Battle Group" and "Brigade".

Exactly what are they and more importantly, how many personnel are supposed to be in each? From Google, a battle group is a temporary organization seemingly made up of what is needed for the operation. Can be less than 50 or more than 100 persons. A brigade can be an entire army, 3000+?

Your use of the terms seems like it is impossible for Canada to put together any of them but it seems they are the number that is needed not some imaginary number of personnel ( and support).

 

Edited by ExFlyer
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1 hour ago, ExFlyer said:

From Google, a battle group is a temporary organization seemingly made up of what is needed for the operation. Can be less than 50 or more than 100 persons. A brigade can be an entire army, 3000+?

Your use of the terms seems like it is impossible for Canada to put together any of them.

That is all correct, you got it. A Brigade is a recognized combined arms formation within the Order of Battle typically 3,000 to 5,000 troops in strength. A Battle Group is the name for any informal and temporary formation that is not a Brigade because it is too small and/or does not  contain all the necessary administrative or functional elements of a brigade.  Also correct that Canada alone cannot even field a full brigade anymore despite the fact that on paper Canada has 3 mechanized infantry brigades in the Regular Force. 
 

Currently the NATO force in Latvia is a Canadian-lead multinational Battlegroup embedded in a Latvian brigade. It consists of 1200-1500 troops of which 1,000 are Canadian. The remainder are from Albania, Czechia, Iceland, Italy, Montenegro, North Macedonia, Poland, Slovakia, Slovenia and Spain. There are currently 8 of these NATO Battle Groups across various Eastern European countries as a result of Russia’s invasion of Ukraine and they will all be scaling up to become standalone Brigades. Canada will continue to lead the Latvia Brigade, providing at least 2,200 out of (I believe) 4,000 total troops. 

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4 hours ago, Aristides said:

40 hrs endurance would make it possible but at the Reaper's cruise speed it would take a good 7 hrs to get from Greenwood or Comox to the arctic coast and 14 hours to Alert. So 28 hours transit time to and from Alert and 12 hrs loiter time, landing back at their base with empty tanks unless the 6000 nm range given in Wiki includes some sort of reserves.

Hellfire missiles would also make it a lot more potent than a DeWolf with its pop gun.

Not bad really.

Well according to the CAF stats they put out in the infographic it’s only going to have 28H endurance for some reason.   I guess 40H is the naked weight not factoring the cameras and sensors CAF wants to put on?  But I note 7200 km range.  I imagine that they would want the aircraft to loiter over areas in the arctic for some time not just make a quick round trip spending most time in transit than on station, so my guess is arctic missions will launch from some northern staging area. 

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1 hour ago, BeaverFever said:

Well according to the CAF stats they put out in the infographic it’s only going to have 28H endurance for some reason.   I guess 40H is the naked weight not factoring the cameras and sensors CAF wants to put on?  But I note 7200 km range.  I imagine that they would want the aircraft to loiter over areas in the arctic for some time not just make a quick round trip spending most time in transit than on station, so my guess is arctic missions will launch from some northern staging area. 

I would think so but if they would need to be based there to give us any kind of meaningful surveillance. 7200 km in 28 hours means an average cruise speed of just under 140 kts, about the final approach speed of your average airliner. 

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5 hours ago, BeaverFever said:

That is all correct, you got it. A Brigade is a recognized combined arms formation within the Order of Battle typically 3,000 to 5,000 troops in strength. A Battle Group is the name for any informal and temporary formation that is not a Brigade because it is too small and/or does not  contain all the necessary administrative or functional elements of a brigade.  ....
 

Currently the NATO force in Latvia is a Canadian-lead multinational Battlegroup embedded in a Latvian brigade. It consists of 1200-1500 troops of which 1,000 are Canadian. The remainder are from Albania, Czechia, Iceland, Italy, Montenegro, North Macedonia, Poland, Slovakia, Slovenia and Spain. There are currently 8 of these NATO Battle Groups across various Eastern European countries as a result of Russia’s invasion of Ukraine and they will all be scaling up to become standalone Brigades. Canada will continue to lead the Latvia Brigade, providing at least 2,200 out of (I believe) 4,000 total troops. 

Being "Canadian led" can be a few Officers or a hundred men.

I did not read anywhere that we would send 2000 to 4000 troops.

 

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2 hours ago, ExFlyer said:

Being "Canadian led" can be a few Officers or a hundred men.

I did not read anywhere that we would send 2000 to 4000 troops.

 

So the MULTINATIONAL brigade will be ~4,000 total troops (from what I can tell), of which at least 2,200 will DEFINITELY be Canadian (plus additional light infantry companies and Chinooks in Canada that will periodically “surge” to the the theatre). The remainder of the brigade will be from the other participating countries. 
 

  • Canada will have up to 2200 persistently deployed Canadian Armed Forces members as part of the enhanced Forward Presence and supporting elements in Latvia, and will be prepared to deploy hundreds more as needed;”

https://www.canada.ca/en/department-national-defence/news/2023/07/roadmap---scaling-the-efp-latvia-battle-group-to-brigade.html

 

Trudeau says Canada will more than double military presence in Latvia

 

RIGA, LATVIA -- It will take another three years for Canada to make good on its commitment to grow a multinational NATO battle group in Latvia to a combat-ready brigade, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau revealed Monday.

The two countries have signed a "road map" outlining the process.

It began more than a year ago, when Canada pledged to increase the size and capability of the battle group as part of NATO's efforts to reinforce its eastern flank and respond to Russia's invasion of Ukraine.

The document sets out three phases for the work, which will eventually involve as many as 2,200 persistently deployed Canadian troops plus the ability to add hundreds of additional Armed Forces members as needed. It states that brigade buildup will be completed in 2025, and that Latvia will work to build new infrastructure.

"By 2026, Canada will complete the full implementation of persistently deployed brigade capabilities to Latvia," the document says.
 

https://beta.ctvnews.ca/national/politics/2023/7/10/1_6473333.amp.html

AND breaking news as of today, Sweden has announced that it will join the Canadian-led brigade as soon as its NATO membership is approved. 

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