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Typically parents are considered to be primarily responsible for that their child is at a healthy weight.

The parents are enormously affected by the medical care, the food industry, education and the media.

If the parents were not doing their job, who would be responsible in taking action?

If a child is overweight, how should a parent go about dealing with it in the correct manner?

 

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Parents should educate themselves.  It's not difficult these days to know what constitutes a good diet.  Cut out the crap and send them outside without a phone.

To my mind, unfettered access to pop and junk food is child abuse, as is unlimited electronic device use.

It's tough, sure, but who's the grownup in the relationship?

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6 hours ago, bcsapper said:

Parents should educate themselves.  It's not difficult these days to know what constitutes a good diet.  Cut out the crap and send them outside without a phone.

To my mind, unfettered access to pop and junk food is child abuse, as is unlimited electronic device use.

It's tough, sure, but who's the grownup in the relationship?

Often enough when you see a fat kid you find out their parents are fat too, especially the mother. People who can't control their own eating are unlikely to put a lot of emphasis on controlling their children's.

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3 hours ago, Argus said:

Often enough when you see a fat kid you find out their parents are fat too, especially the mother. People who can't control their own eating are unlikely to put a lot of emphasis on controlling their children's.

Yeah, that's probably true.  I'm at a loss to understand why, in this day and age, people don't pay more attention to what they put in their bodies.

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Some places lack real grocery stores within walking distance of a community and people in that community don't have money for busses, or gas or cars.  There are, however convenience stores and fast food places nearby, so thats their food source.  People can actually be simultaneously obese and malnourished.

Creators of processed and convenience foods do tons of research to find out what will make the brain hooked on their food - needs just the right amount of fat, sugar and salt, crunchiness or meltiness.  Real science, actual addiction.

Certainly in many cases people do know better, and could do better.  But its not the only factor that is contributing to the rise in obesity in Western countries.

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24 minutes ago, dialamah said:

Some places lack real grocery stores within walking distance of a community and people in that community don't have money for busses, or gas or cars.  There are, however convenience stores and fast food places nearby, so thats their food source.  People can actually be simultaneously obese and malnourished.

Creators of processed and convenience foods do tons of research to find out what will make the brain hooked on their food - needs just the right amount of fat, sugar and salt, crunchiness or meltiness.  Real science, actual addiction.

Certainly in many cases people do know better, and could do better.  But its not the only factor that is contributing to the rise in obesity in Western countries.

What percentage of people who are fat don't live within walking (or public transit) distance of a grocery store? 

No argument that corporations will do whatever it takes to make people buy their stuff.  I used to smoke.   But nobody has to drink pop or eat fast food. 

Edited by bcsapper
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5 hours ago, Argus said:

Often enough when you see a fat kid you find out their parents are fat too, especially the mother. People who can't control their own eating are unlikely to put a lot of emphasis on controlling their children's.

Or if they eat bad crap they're likely going to feed their kids bad crap too

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On 1/25/2020 at 10:32 PM, dialamah said:

Some places lack real grocery stores within walking distance of a community and people in that community don't have money for busses, or gas or cars.  There are, however convenience stores and fast food places nearby, so thats their food source.  People can actually be simultaneously obese and malnourished.

Creators of processed and convenience foods do tons of research to find out what will make the brain hooked on their food - needs just the right amount of fat, sugar and salt, crunchiness or meltiness.  Real science, actual addiction.

Certainly in many cases people do know better, and could do better.  But its not the only factor that is contributing to the rise in obesity in Western countries.

Total  nonsense.

As you note: "In many cases people do know and could do better.... "

========

IME, American leftists like you diamalah are condescending teachers - but typically hypocrites.

You don't understand that the rest of the world speaks of you the same way that you speak of Americans, yourself.

BTW, it's called irony.

Edited by August1991
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10 hours ago, August1991 said:

IME, American leftists like you diamalah

I'm not American, so it's weird you would say that.   I do rely on people who're experts in their field over less mainstream (aka fringe) sources for many of my views, so if that's 'leftist', ok.

Quote

are condescending teachers - but typically hypocrites.

????   Talking about well known social factors in the increase in obesity is condescending and hypocritical?   You'd rather just shame parents?   

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On 1/26/2020 at 12:18 AM, Argus said:

People who can't control their own eating are unlikely to put a lot of emphasis on controlling their children's.

Based on what? Controlling your own diet is an entirely different matter from controlling another's. Since parents love their children, the most logical reason they would not take care of their child's diet is lack of education and not lack of will.

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On ‎1‎/‎25‎/‎2020 at 5:18 PM, Argus said:

Often enough when you see a fat kid you find out their parents are fat too, especially the mother. People who can't control their own eating are unlikely to put a lot of emphasis on controlling their children's.

That has been proven in many studies. Its the behavior of the parents children imitate not what parents say.

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On ‎2‎/‎2‎/‎2020 at 1:33 AM, August1991 said:

Total  nonsense.

As you note: "In many cases people do know and could do better.... "

========

IME, American leftists like you diamalah are condescending teachers - but typically hypocrites.

You don't understand that the rest of the world speaks of you the same way that you speak of Americans, yourself.

BTW, it's called irony.

People up North in Canada do NOT have access to balanced diet foods. That is a fact. The epidemic rates of diabetes, heart-disease and other nutrition related diseases in native Canadian communities has clearly been linked to lack of access to fresh vegetables and fruit.  That is not by choice.

In inner cities, lack of nutritional education is caused primarily by lack of education NOT  lack of access. Socio-economic and educational status are directly related to this issue. Ethnicity does too. Some ethnic diets are low in bad cholesterol or avoid processed foods two of the largest factors in obesity as well as lack of exercise. In segments of Canadian society where food is accessible, education and lack of exercise become the two major factors of obesity and as Argus points out what goes on in the home. This is all documented by the many medical charities and Health Canada with objective criteria.

Today we have the phenomena of both parents working and they come home to kids parked in front of the internet stuffing their faces on junk food. Children today are brought up stuffing their face on junk food and sitting in front of computers and not exercising  and when their parents come home tired, of course  its easier to throw something in the micro wave then cook it fresh adding to the problem.

Obesity is a lifestyle related illness, but it can be caused by inter-connected issues to poverty, limited access to food, lack of education, and /or pre-existing physical or mental illnesses.

I can tell you that home economics courses teaching healthy diets, regular exercise at school, and health sciences explaining nutrition as well, all help deal with the issue. That is directly based on studies. You can find them easily on the internet or go to the Heart And Stroke Fund  or Diabetes Canada or Health Canada or ANY hospital in Canada.

Regards, someone who eats too much junk but whose head is fat for other reasons

 

Edited by Rue
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4 hours ago, Rue said:

People up North in Canada do NOT have access to balanced diet foods. That is a fact. The epidemic rates of diabetes, heart-disease and other nutrition related diseases in native Canadian communities has clearly been linked to lack of access to fresh vegetables and fruit.  That is not by choice.

 

I think it's been more closely linked to switching from traditional food they hunted to eating new foods they're not adapted for. Much of the decision to make that switch wasn't by their choice either. 

Edited by eyeball
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  • 8 months later...

When one sees obese parents and children together, the situation may not be simply about bad parenting. Some research suggests that obesity is largely caused by an inherited vulnerability to environmental factors. The real wonder is how some people manage to stay thin despite the ubiquity of high calorie food today but they do, again partly due to genetic factors:

"This research shows for the first time that healthy thin people are generally thin because they have a lower burden of genes that increase a person's chances of being overweight and not because they are morally superior, as some people like to suggest," says Professor Farooqi. "It's easy to rush to judgement and criticise people for their weight, but the science shows that things are far more complex. We have far less control over our weight than we might wish to think."

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/01/190124141538.htm

Some crucial determinants of how fat we get lie in the neurohormonal control of appetite which is an intricate system only partially understood. 

 

 

 

 

Edited by SpankyMcFarland
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On 2/9/2020 at 6:45 PM, eyeball said:

I think it's been more closely linked to switching from traditional food they hunted to eating new foods they're not adapted for. Much of the decision to make that switch wasn't by their choice either. 

Here's an article on a Métis doctor who went back to a low carb traditional diet and saw dramatic results:

https://www.cbc.ca/radio/checkup/what-s-the-best-way-to-tackle-canada-s-weight-problem-1.4558944/revisiting-my-big-fat-diet-how-a-métis-doctor-lost-weight-with-a-traditional-indigenous-diet-1.4562134

 

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  • 4 weeks later...
On 1/25/2020 at 1:01 AM, Marocc said:

If a child is overweight, how should a parent go about dealing with it in the correct manner?

 

The parent should make available good food in the house, and teach the kid to prepare good meals with it. The parent should ensure the kid values exercise as well, probably organic useful exercise rather than running on a treadmill. The answer is quite clear if you frame the question as you have I think.

How one get's the parent(s) into that situation is the tough one. For example just knowing 'good food' means is a loaded question. Off the top of my head I can name 3 different diet philosophies being utilized by people I know, and they all swear what they're doing is the summit of nutrition philosophy. There's alot of diet data, a lot of Netflix diet shows, and a lot of diet pundits...

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On 1/25/2020 at 2:01 AM, Marocc said:

If a child is overweight, how should a parent go about dealing with it in the correct manner?

Parents should give their children healthy food to eat, instead of sugary processed garbage.  Fruit is a healthy snack.  Also, force them to play outside instead of spending too much time watching TV and playing video games.  This includes not depending too much on using the TV as a babysitter.

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 11/14/2020 at 12:37 AM, Moonlight Graham said:

Parents should give their children healthy food to eat, instead of sugary processed garbage.  Fruit is a healthy snack.  Also, force them to play outside instead of spending too much time watching TV and playing video games.  This includes not depending too much on using the TV as a babysitter.

Fruit is very expensive in outback Canada and playing outside in freezing darkness isn’t for everybody. 

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  • 2 weeks later...

I believe that no matter what, whether you care for the child or not, the parent is the sole responsible person(s) for that child's health. That is your child. If one does not want to cook healthy foods at home, the parent could find healthier options at a gas station. Not the most pleasant, but it is healthier than getting a child sugar, salt, and many other unhealthy things every single day. Some may say, fast food is cheaper, yes that can be correct. But a family can save so much more buying products at the store to make healthy meals and still have some of the bought goods to be used at a later time. If the parent is lazy to make food, that is a whole other story and can sometimes be considered as neglect of the child which can be a huge ordeal for the parent.

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2 hours ago, glo135 said:

I believe that no matter what, whether you care for the child or not, the parent is the sole responsible person(s) for that child's health. 

You don't think Ronald McDonald should be asked to own up to his influence?  I often wonder how he can look in the mirror.

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13 minutes ago, Michael Hardner said:

You don't think Ronald McDonald should be asked to own up to his influence?  I often wonder how he can look in the mirror.

I think those who let Ronald get away with it are far worse.  I think every company or corporation that sells anything to anyone should be forced to say what all the worst aspects of their product are, before they can extol them in any commercial.

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  • 4 months later...

We were sent from the kindergarten to an endocrinologist with a diagnosis of pre-obesity. We did an ultrasound of the thyroid gland and passed a blood sugar test-everything is normal. The endocrinologist diagnosed obesity of the 2nd degree. It is clear that the whole problem is in nutrition. My daughter was born with a weight of -3650, but by the time she was a year old she was not a thin child, and until the age of 4 she was just a little plump, and for the last two years she was just like a leapfrog. Now she is 6 years old, height 125cm, weight 35.5 kg. I noticed that when she sits at home (vacation, weekend, sick leave), we immediately lose weight, but as soon as she goes to kindergarten, she immediately gains weight. My husband even laughed, the first day after the hospital went to the garden and in the evening straight with a tummy ball returned. We decided to investigate this issue and adjusted the menu in for our child with the permissions of the guide. It's good that Kid City USA met us halfway and we didn't have any problems.

Edited by MillisJonny
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  • 2 weeks later...
On 12/10/2020 at 7:52 PM, Michael Hardner said:

You don't think Ronald McDonald should be asked to own up to his influence?  I often wonder how he can look in the mirror.

McDonald's doesn't force parents to bring their children to their restaurants, it's a choice, parents have free will.  There were many sugary cereals I wanted as  a kid that my mom would rarely buy me.

McDonald's should be required to make their nutrition info available.  But you can't blame them when virtually any parent knows McD's isn't healthy food anyways.  Believe it or not, parents can say no to their children.

Edited by Moonlight Graham
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It's not as simple as parents failing to say no to McDonalds; there are other factors.  Here are just two.

Food deserts:  "Research from Canada indicates that some cities have food deserts, including London, Ontario, where low-income inner-city residents were shown to have the poorest access to supermarkets,20 and Gatineau, Quebec, where 7.5% of the population live with limited financial resources along with low access to healthy food."

Overly supervised, to the point that parents can be reported and charged for allowing their kids to be outside, unsupervised - even in their own yard.  "Is there any other child-raising issue that's more controversial than kids playing outside alone? It doesn't seem that long ago that parents encouraged, even insisted, that their children go outside and play with the other neighborhood kids. "Be home by dinner," was my mom's favorite saying. Times have really changed, though. For many parents today the idea of their kids playing outside alone is simply unthinkable.  

[ ]

Other studies have concluded that free, unsupervised play promotes a wealth of positive benefits, like healthy weight, cognitive function, social and emotional development, empathy, and group management skills."

 

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