Jump to content

Nov 20: "Kick A Ginger Day"


kimmy

Recommended Posts

Fans of the button-pushing television show celebrate something called Kick A Ginger Day on Nov. 20, flowing from the show's pokes at red-haired children as "born with a disease" and "nasty." The supposed "event" has sparked a rash of groups, in support and against, on the social networking site Facebook.

http://www.cbc.ca/canada/manitoba/story/20...ick-ginger.html

http://www.cbc.ca/arts/story/2008/11/20/gi...ck-warning.html

South Park is known for relentless satire on just about any controversial topic. Anything from racism to religion to political correctness is ridiculed without mercy.

The show is often controversial and often generates debate about whether they go "too far" or whether there's even such thing as "too far".

However: it's clearly not a kids show. Kids are dumb. Kids don't understand satire.

-k

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 76
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Are we, red-haired?

;)

Red haired celtics are have the most beautiful woman in the world - to call red haired people nasty is like ugly rich american woman insisting on the bombing of Afghanistan because the woman their have ancient natural beauty...and they seek to destroy what they envy. :blink:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It should read "kick a ginger" and get charged with assault

we are raising a generation of bullies who cannot distinguish good from evil

the facebook creates enormous pressures for children, teens because they group together very quickly and seem to want to compare, outdo each other in this social space.

I have also spoken with some kids about this "add a friend" in the facebook, and I am in bewilderment. If you are added as a friend it means "friend". A stranger can become a friend. If a ginger is on the friend list they are friends means it is ok to prank a friend if the call was out.

Some of these bullies will enter the workplace in about 3 years and they will physically hurt people to get where they want to be.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Parents have stopped raising their own kids and are letting the TV do it for them because they are too damned lazy! I wouldn't allow my kids to watch this smut nor would I allow them to watch the Simpsons or anything else like that.

On the contray, they are not lazy. Once the illusion of finacial freedom was granted to pseudo feminists - an enslavement took place - Instead of one income supporting a family - it became two incomes. Opportunists saw this and took advantage of the double labour and devalued familiar income in order to turn a bigger profit under the guise of female freedom. Finally two incomes became less than one. The parents are run ragged and are exhuasted trying to keep up with this new and corrupt system of survival. Dummies like Layton, instead of addressing the real issue continue to request more soviet style day care spots. The kid are no longer parented (and early childhood education is just a conditioning of slaves) and wives are no longer under the care of husbandry. So the kids are now property of big buisness and their henchmen the state...and the those two entities do not give a damn for other peoples kids - they pretend to but do not.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Are we, red-haired?

;)

Well, more blonde than anything.

But that wasn't the point. I didn't post that because I was worried about my own safety. (Anybody who kicks me for whatever reason had better be worried about their own damned safety. Kicking kimmy is an extraordinarily bad idea. It's simply not done.)

I thought there were a few interesting ideas involved. First off, as Mr Canada pointed out, the role of parents. As Oleg touched on, the idea that what would be a shocking idea if directed at an ethnic or racial group seems to provoke none of that reaction when directed at kicks who are not an ethnic or racial group but are nonetheless an identifiable group.

RB also points out the phenomenon of social networking and its role in this story.

-k

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't think everything shown on TV is acceptable. Media in general can be a very powerful influence on peoples minds. I try and limit what my own kids watch. but it's not posible to do it all the time. They are in their teens now but my attitude is, if I don't want to watch it, they shouldn't. The internet is a whole new ball game, as far as thats concerned.

But my kids and I watched that show, Ginger Kids... it did not change us and I don't expect my kids to go out and cause a problem for anyone. Still I know many kids are insensitive and they might be influenced in their behaviour.

I don't think the number of bullies is increasing. There are just some who have these problems, and they find different reasons to single out people who are different and make an issue out of it. Obviously whether its abuse of ginger kids, blacks, chinese or what have you, it should not be tolerated and criminal charges should be applied when its necessary.

Edited by Sir Bandelot
Link to comment
Share on other sites

South Park is in my top 10 all time fave shows. They are so wrong on so many levels, and well, they don't hold back on anyone. Not even a former cast member like Issac Hayes. Hayes got a little upset about 'Tom Cruise stuck in the closet' epp and how scientology is evil. So Chef was killed off in a spectacular manner. I mean, you can't be on South Park and be offended by the content that is on the show. You just don't belong in South Park.

IN any case, I have always been impressed with the quality of writting on the show. I have rarely been let down by them.

And the epp with the Ginger Kids is more or less a take on how Hilter was able to rally the masses to support and persecute another people. The Ginger Kids essentially are a metaphore for the Jews plight in Nazi Germany.

This show is not for kids. Don't let your kids watch it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On the contray, they are not lazy. Once the illusion of finacial freedom was granted to pseudo feminists - an enslavement took place - Instead of one income supporting a family - it became two incomes. Opportunists saw this and took advantage of the double labour and devalued familiar income in order to turn a bigger profit under the guise of female freedom. Finally two incomes became less than one. The parents are run ragged and are exhuasted trying to keep up with this new and corrupt system of survival. Dummies like Layton, instead of addressing the real issue continue to request more soviet style day care spots. The kid are no longer parented (and early childhood education is just a conditioning of slaves) and wives are no longer under the care of husbandry. So the kids are now property of big buisness and their henchmen the state...and the those two entities do not give a damn for other peoples kids - they pretend to but do not.

I'm reasonably certain that you cannot speak for all parents so please don't...:)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I thought there were a few interesting ideas involved. First off, as Mr Canada pointed out, the role of parents. As Oleg touched on, the idea that what would be a shocking idea if directed at an ethnic or racial group seems to provoke none of that reaction when directed at kicks who are not an ethnic or racial group but are nonetheless an identifiable group.

RB also points out the phenomenon of social networking and its role in this story.

-k

Isnt this much ado about nothing? Has there been a rash of red haired kids getting kicked? Not that I have heard .

In the context of satire thru South Park, arent they skewering every identifiable group? They skewer almost everything and I cant think of a group they havent. The satire is pretty much bang on, and funny I might add, and there is a lesson in pretty much each episode, similar to the Simpsons. (how caqn anyone, aside from my brother, not let kids watch the Simpsons?)

Parents are what they have always been. Some good, some not so good. The volume of the not so good is the same, ratio wise , as the ones that are good.

Were the cartoons we grew up with any better? They were far more violent than they are today.Yet as kids, we knew enough that dropping a anvil on the local coyote would result in injury, yet we laughed when we watched it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Were the cartoons we grew up with any better? They were far more violent than they are today.Yet as kids, we knew enough that dropping a anvil on the local coyote would result in injury, yet we laughed when we watched it.

Ahh Looney Tunes / Bugs, Tweety, Fudd, Peppe Le Pue... the classics.

I watched the good ones in the 70s and 80s. Then as I grew older and watched them again, they constantly got edited and changed. I was pissed. It changed the whole dynamic of the show and how it was supposed to be. Also, you will never get another cartoon where the score was perfectly tailored to the action on the screen.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ample parking day or night...

------------------------------

Ms. Garrison: Okay kids, looks like we only have time for one more speech today, so let's have, uh, Eric.

Cartman: Thank you, Ms. Garrison. My speech is entitled "Ginger Kids". Children with red hair, light skin, and freckles. We've all seen them. On the playground, at the store, walking on the streets. They creep us out, and make us sick to our stomachs. I'm talking, of course, about Ginger Kids.

---South Park

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Has there been a rash of red haired kids getting kicked? Not that I have heard .

The plot thickens....

Assault on red-haired student investigated as hate crime

Thirteen high school students in Calgary have been suspended after a red-headed teen was beaten because of the colour of his hair.

The Grade 10 boy was attacked in the locker room of St. Francis High School after gym class Thursday, students told CBC News.

The victim was taken to hospital for examination, and a spokeswoman for the Calgary Catholic School District said Friday he sustained "some minor bruising" to his upper body.

Calgary police are looking into the assault as a possible hate crime.

"The fact of the matter is from a policing perspective, it is a hate crime, and this individual was targeted because of the fact they have red hair," said police spokesman Kevin Brookwell.

link

... and hate-crime it is.

Edited to add: Oh wow, there are more!

20 B.C. students sent home for kicking red-haired classmates

Twenty students from a Vancouver Island school were sent home Thursday after they kicked red-haired schoolmates as part of what an internet site declared "Kick a Ginger Day."

The students from Journey Middle School in Sooke got the idea of kicking their red-headed peers from the social networking website, Facebook.

The Facebook group was likely inspired by South Park, a satirical animated TV show that aired an episode declaring: "[Red-haired people] creep us out. They make us feel sick to our stomachs."

link

Prince George student bullied on 'Kick a Ginger' day

A boy in northern B.C. singled out because of his red hair was bullied at school Thursday in an incident that appears to have been incited by a group on the social networking site Facebook.

The Facebook group declared Nov. 20 Canada-wide "Kick a Ginger Day" following a recent episode of the television cartoon South Park that poked fun at red-haired children, referring to them as "nasty" and "born with a disease."

A student with red hair at D.P. Todd Secondary School in Prince George was kicked in the legs and had to be sent home as a result, said Lyn Hall, chairman of the Prince George school board.

link

Edited by BC_chick
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Isnt this much ado about nothing?

A handy way to check for bias is to substitute a noun with a different noun. In this instance, I am highly confident that if the facebook group were "Kick a Jew Day" or "Kick an Arab Day" (just to pick a couple at random) it would be taken extremely seriously.

Has there been a rash of red haired kids getting kicked? Not that I have heard .
Apparently yes.

http://www.canada.com/vancouversun/news/st...17-a9b8b314af71

http://www.ctvbc.ctv.ca/servlet/an/local/C...ishColumbiaHome

http://www.canada.com/story.html?id=18b43b...68-3b53f8fb26d4

http://www.thespec.com/News/article/470441

http://www.princegeorgecitizen.com/2008112...s-targeted.html

From a quick search through google news.

In the context of satire thru South Park, arent they skewering every identifiable group? They skewer almost everything and I cant think of a group they havent. The satire is pretty much bang on, and funny I might add, and there is a lesson in pretty much each episode, similar to the Simpsons. (how caqn anyone, aside from my brother, not let kids watch the Simpsons?

It certainly seems obvious that South Park was making a parody of ignorance and bigotry. Yet... the message seems to have been completely lost on some teenagers.

Parents are what they have always been. Some good, some not so good. The volume of the not so good is the same, ratio wise , as the ones that are good.

Were the cartoons we grew up with any better? They were far more violent than they are today.Yet as kids, we knew enough that dropping a anvil on the local coyote would result in injury, yet we laughed when we watched it.

I don't know that there was ever a facebook group set up to plan anvil-attacks on coyotes. I think the herd mentality figured into this to some degree. Also, South Park is rather different from Bugs Bunny Roadrunner Hour. Talking animals attacking each other with dynamite is all rather nonsensical. The South Park kids, while cartoons, are kids who go to school and are often faced with realistic issues. I also think the allure of doing something subversive figured into this.

-k

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ahh its not that bad. If your kids are normal human beings it's not going to be a problem.

But for the abnormal people... :blink:

Yes could be a problem

Well, teens maybe, but like 12 under. forget it. The swearing alone demands that :).

However, I have watched some of these new cartoon shows for kids... um... wow. Much of it is really horrible. And on the whole, more violent than the cartoons of my day. Some of the animation is so quick, It just does not seem to flow, and after 3 minuites I get a headache from watching it.

Kimmy

It certainly seems obvious that South Park was making a parody of ignorance and bigotry. Yet... the message seems to have been completely lost on some teenagers.

So, parents, get involed with your kid's life. You are right here Kimmy. There are times when I watched some South Park epps, and had to rewatch it to really understand it. Their writting is damn good for an animated series. And if it can be lost on an adult like me, then you can have dumb kids go around kicking other kids because of the red hair.

Parents, if your child has kicked a red head, give them a kick. And kick yourself while you are at it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If this case is taken seriously as a hate crime, it will probably mean that we are too dumbed down as a society to handle satire. The kids who beat the victim in this case likely would have found some other excuse if they hadn't seen the Ginger Kids episode on South Park.

I got hooked on South Park about ten years ago because my kids were watching the show, and I started watching along with them. One of the first episodes I watched was the UFO episode where Cartman is abducted by aliens. It began with Kyle punting his little brother after he followed the boys to the school bus stop; I'm not aware if any kids tried to kick their toddler-siblings like a football, but I'm sure someone would have used this clip as a justification for assault if it had actually occurred in real life.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If this case is taken seriously as a hate crime, it will probably mean that we are too dumbed down as a society to handle satire.

The episode of South Park that inspired this event was intended as a satire... the person who started the "Kick a Ginger" group might have even intended it as a satire... but at the point where there was an actual swarming with an actual victim, it's not satire anymore.

Why shouldn't it be considered a hate crime? I don't have the text of Canada's hate-crime legislation handy... is there some clause that specifies that it's not actually a hate crime unless the victim is non-white, gay, Jewish, or Muslim?

One could argue that the concept of a "hate crime" is inherently flawed to start with. If I punch someone as I walk down the street, does it actually matter why I did it? If I said that I did it because I thought the victim looked like an immigrant, does it become more serious than if I said I did it because I was having a bad day? Should the prosecutor be trying to convince the jury that I did it because the victim was brown rather than because I have anger management problems? There's an argument to be made on both sides, perhaps, but the law seems to believe that inciting violence against an identifiable group is a very serious issue, and from all appearances this case certainly seems to qualify.

The kids who beat the victim in this case likely would have found some other excuse if they hadn't seen the Ginger Kids episode on South Park.

We'll have to wait for more information.

If the same group swarmed the same kid on a regular basis before this incident, then you'd have a point. (then again, if the same group swarmed the same kid on a regular basis, how come nothing was done about it before now?)

I got hooked on South Park about ten years ago because my kids were watching the show, and I started watching along with them. One of the first episodes I watched was the UFO episode where Cartman is abducted by aliens. It began with Kyle punting his little brother after he followed the boys to the school bus stop; I'm not aware if any kids tried to kick their toddler-siblings like a football, but I'm sure someone would have used this clip as a justification for assault if it had actually occurred in real life.

Have people organized to declare a day on which to punt their toddler siblings? If so, did they actually follow through? We need details!

-k

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It would seem that I misjusdged this one. To BC chick and kimmy thanks for the links. I assumed, wrongly, that because I did not hear about any, they didnt occur. Ooops.

A handy way to check for bias is to substitute a noun with a different noun. In this instance, I am highly confident that if the facebook group were "Kick a Jew Day" or "Kick an Arab Day" (just to pick a couple at random) it would be taken extremely seriously.

Hard to argue, except lots of people get dumb ideas, including kick an arab/jew day. The only difference is that it doesnt get traction. This one obviously did.

I think to say "substitute X" and see where it leads is a misnomer.

From a quick search through google news.

Something I should have done, but didnt.

I also think the allure of doing something subversive figured into this.

-k

Probably moreso than any other reasoning. Kids know its dumb, big numbers or not.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 year later...

Believe it or not...

LA Times

Barrie Picayune Tribune

(and many more)

...a year later, "Kick A Ginger Day" resulted in just as many incidents this year, in both Canada and the US. A great way to cap "Bullying Awareness Week". :rolleyes:

-k

{I kind of wish they'd had this when I was in school. I'd have dyed myself red and dished out some absolutely epic beat-downs to anybody who even looked at me funny.}

Edited by kimmy
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest American Woman
I kind of wish they'd had this when I was in school. I'd have dyed myself red and dished out some absolutely epic beat-downs to anybody who even looked at me funny.

How non-violent of you to wish, as an adult, for the opportunity to have attacked those who 'so much as looked at you funny' -- for dying yourself red, no less -- as you criticize kids who engaged in violence.

:rolleyes:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Unfortunately, your content contains terms that we do not allow. Please edit your content to remove the highlighted words below.
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Tell a friend

    Love Repolitics.com - Political Discussion Forums? Tell a friend!
  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
      10,770
    • Most Online
      1,403

    Newest Member
    Akalupenn
    Joined
  • Recent Achievements

  • Recently Browsing

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...