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Is life in the USA that bad?


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I'm from a poor European country, I've seen many videos and podcasts about how bad life is in the USA, millions of Americans are suffering and live below poverty, health system is private and you can go bankrupt after, rampant corruption, guns and violence everywhere, if you want to go to college you'll live in dept for the rest of your life. There's no work life balance and most people are overworked and exhausted. Dating for men is a nightmare too because American women are too delusional and want only chads. My sources come from YouTube, Instagram and Reddit mostly.  Is it true that USA is that bad for most people? 

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 2/5/2024 at 5:35 PM, everydaynormalguy said:

Dating for men is a nightmare too because American women are too delusional and want only chads.

According to no-life incels.  

On 2/5/2024 at 5:35 PM, everydaynormalguy said:

My sources come from YouTube, Instagram and Reddit mostly.

Those aren't sources. 

On 2/5/2024 at 5:35 PM, everydaynormalguy said:

Is it true that USA is that bad for most people?

 No.  

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My turn to feed the troll?

All of those things in OP's first ever post (yeah....right) are true - but the measure of a country is far greater than any of the transient conditions.  To make this very simple:  I measure a country by a few simple standards.  One is how it has treated POWs and how it treats detainees.   I have worked in many countries and experienced many "tests" of personal rights and freedoms, but one week in Hereford TX particularly sticks in my mind.  We were staying at a small motel with an outside pool in a 110 degree F summer outdoor work situation.    There was a very well dressed late middle aged woman at breakfast each day - clearly NOT from TX.  After a few days of hearing her accent, I approached her to ask if she was from Switzerland.  She chuckled and replied: "very close, I live on Lac Maggiore just West of Lugano."  She was an English Prof over to research a book she was writing about her Father's experiences in WWII.   He was a Fascist.  When the Allied forces rolled in, most Italian soldiers just changed their rifles for Enfields and pointed them in the opposite direction, but the hard core fascist officers were arrested and sent of to POW camps - and her Father's was near Hereford.   The prisoners were treated extremely well, and often taken out on holidays to local homes for parties, celebrations, etc.  Many managed to claim sanctuary after the war and stayed in USA.  She wanted to meet and understand the society that treated their "enemies" in that manner.

My other related story is my own Father's.   He was a munitions worker for most of WWII and not allowed to enlist.  He wore the system down and managed to sign up late in '44 - and promptly came down with pneumonia in boot camp - so spent the rest of the war as a POW guard.  When he served as artillery instructor in the '60s he had a ready made family of very good friends - his former prisoners.

If you want to understand the US (and to some extent Canada) find some POWs who survived other countries and see if you can spot the differences.  THEN you will understand why I live here and gladly do most of my business in USA - even with all of its (and our) problems.

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  • 1 month later...
On 2/16/2024 at 10:42 AM, cannuck said:

My turn to feed the troll?

All of those things in OP's first ever post (yeah....right) are true - but the measure of a country is far greater than any of the transient conditions.  To make this very simple:  I measure a country by a few simple standards.  One is how it has treated POWs and how it treats detainees.   I have worked in many countries and experienced many "tests" of personal rights and freedoms, but one week in Hereford TX particularly sticks in my mind.  We were staying at a small motel with an outside pool in a 110 degree F summer outdoor work situation.    There was a very well dressed late middle aged woman at breakfast each day - clearly NOT from TX.  After a few days of hearing her accent, I approached her to ask if she was from Switzerland.  She chuckled and replied: "very close, I live on Lac Maggiore just West of Lugano."  She was an English Prof over to research a book she was writing about her Father's experiences in WWII.   He was a Fascist.  When the Allied forces rolled in, most Italian soldiers just changed their rifles for Enfields and pointed them in the opposite direction, but the hard core fascist officers were arrested and sent of to POW camps - and her Father's was near Hereford.   The prisoners were treated extremely well, and often taken out on holidays to local homes for parties, celebrations, etc.  Many managed to claim sanctuary after the war and stayed in USA.  She wanted to meet and understand the society that treated their "enemies" in that manner.

My other related story is my own Father's.   He was a munitions worker for most of WWII and not allowed to enlist.  He wore the system down and managed to sign up late in '44 - and promptly came down with pneumonia in boot camp - so spent the rest of the war as a POW guard.  When he served as artillery instructor in the '60s he had a ready made family of very good friends - his former prisoners.

If you want to understand the US (and to some extent Canada) find some POWs who survived other countries and see if you can spot the differences.  THEN you will understand why I live here and gladly do most of my business in USA - even with all of its (and our) problems.


Internees in neutral Ireland, also called ‘guests of the nation’ and usually airmen or sailors stranded there, had a much better time. I think the Germans were better off. The British were quietly repatriated to fight another day but the Germans had a cushy war:

Quote

Over time, the relaxation of the parole system allowed internees to attend religious services, the cinema, dances, public houses and horse-races. The Germans were able to use the army recreational facilities and to compete against local and army sports teams.

Quote

Moreover, eighteen German internees were allowed to attend classes at University College Dublin and a further three at the College of Technology, Bolton Street. Throughout their education, the students were housed in a number of private residential houses in areas such as Glenageary, Mount Merrion, Merrion Road, Rathmines, Lower Baggot Street and Sandymount. This was all under the condition that the internees would not ‘seek or accept any assistance’ to escape or ‘engage in any material activity or activities contrary to the interests of Eire’.

Quote

Throughout the local area surrounding the Curragh, Germans worked as labourers, tailors, stable hands, gardeners, painters, chefs, butchers, farmers and turf-cutters. Consequently, many Germans integrated well into the nearby communities and developed friendships with locals from the neighbouring towns of Kilcullen, Newbridge and Kildare; some even married local girls. 


I don’t think any of them tried to escape. As noted above they had to promise not to!

https://www.historyireland.com/german-internees-curragh-camp/#:~:text=By the end of the,Biscay on 27 December 1943.

Edited by SpankyMcFarland
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