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Putin, 1938, National Geographic & America


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1. I recently read this nonsense:

That 1938 Feeling (Glenn Reynolds Link:) https://instapundit.substack.com/p/that-1938-feeling?r=9bg2k&utm_campaign=post&utm_medium=web&triedRedirect=true

IMHO, the current world is closer to 1912. In 2024, we have had several generations of peace - and like in 1912, we have an elite that thinks it can solve problems quickly.

2. If you want to understand what Putin was talking about, look at this National Geographic map of 1913:

https://searchworks.stanford.edu/view/5586627

I once used the map to travel in Europe.

3. Some people argue that Hitler rose to power because he made lower middle class feel important.

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On 4/3/2024 at 3:55 PM, August1991 said:

IMHO, the current world is closer to 1912. In 2024, we have had several generations of peace - and like in 1912, we have an elite that thinks it can solve problems quickly.

It's not very often that a punchline sneaks up on me like that, but I did not see that coming. 

When you were talking about the failures that led to WWI, and then I read "an elite that thinks it can solve problems quickly", the first thing that came to mind was the current POTUS, and coffee shot up into my nose.  

I dunno if you were trying to be funny, but that was comedy gold. 

Quote

2. If you want to understand what Putin was talking about, look at this National Geographic map of 1913:

https://searchworks.stanford.edu/view/5586627

Not so long ago in the grand scheme of things I guess.

I still wouldn't consider Ukraine a part of Russia, but seeing that map explains a lot of distaste - from the Russian POV - for seeing Ukraine become Russia's geopolitical enemy.

Quote

3. Some people argue that Hitler rose to power because he made lower middle class feel important.

I don't see Hitler "rising to power" as the actual root of the problem. I think the actual problem was that there was a whole generation of Germans who spent their early adulthood living in ugly trench warfare, and then they endured a horrible depression, for which they placed a lot of blame on banks siphoning money out of their country. 

If you compare the life that a kid born in 1901 in Germany to a Canadian born in 1968, like me, it's night and day. From 17-21 they were fighting in trenches, then they endured economic hardships and hunger unlike anything that we've ever seen here, and "banks" actually were partly to blame. Money that left Germany to go abroad all went through the banks. They actually were enemies of the German people, although that stems from the poor Armistice agreement and not the banks themselves.

From 17-21 I was mainly in our military but I never saw a shot fired in anger and I've never been hungry or out of work. I'm an extremely liberal person compared to a 1901-born German, but if I grew up in that set of circumstances I'd be a completely different person. Same planet, different level of international humanity. I grew up within a sea of humanity - I'm a product of it. 1901 Germans were not a product of humanity. It was other-worldly to them.

1935 Germany was rife with people who grew up murdering people in trenches, watching their friends get murdered, and then sat around hungry with their family, wondering where their next meal would come from, for ten solid years. it was a powderkeg just waiting for a spark. If it wasn't Adolf Hitler that rose to prominence there, I think that there were twenty thousand other Germans who would have been just as bad as he was. 

I think that Palestinians are the exact same as those Germans were. Not because of the Israelis, but because of the 20 muslim countries that insisted they stay there in refugee camps for 4 generations. At the end of the day though, Palestinians don't grow up hating the people they should hate. 

Edited by WestCanMan
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1 minute ago, Michael Hardner said:

But what?  

This is 2024.

Like Kissinger and Trudeau Snr, I reckon that we need a new structure of peace, counterweights.

In July 1914, many ordinary people lived well.

And then, an elite, told ordinary what to do.

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Posted (edited)
11 hours ago, WestCanMan said:

If you compare the life that a kid born in 1901 in Germany to a Canadian born in 1968, like me, it's night and day

...

Good point.

The young Russian men born around 1780 or so were involved in a war, likely to die.

Many Russian men born around 1920 died too.

Chance, fate.

 

 

Edited by August1991
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4 hours ago, August1991 said:

Disagree.

===

Before 1914, Europe was a civilised society - like Canada today.

I think you're underestimating the effect of an entire generation of young men being raised on trench warfare and then going through a depression.

By the time those guys who were born in 1901 were 35 they had just endured 18 really horrific years as adults. 

Say what you want, I know for a fact that it was just a generation that was ripe for trouble.

Compare those guys to our God-damned worthless losers in Canada today. They all grew up with 3-4 square meals a day, most kids don't lift a finger at home they just ply video games all day, and at the first sign of fascism they yell "SIGN ME UP!"

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On 4/6/2024 at 3:57 AM, WestCanMan said:

It's not very often that a punchline sneaks up on me like that, but I did not see that coming. 

When you were talking about the failures that led to WWI, and then I read "an elite that thinks it can solve problems quickly", the first thing that came to mind was the current POTUS, and coffee shot up into my nose.  

I dunno if you were trying to be funny, but that was comedy gold. 

Not so long ago in the grand scheme of things I guess.

I still wouldn't consider Ukraine a part of Russia, but seeing that map explains a lot of distaste - from the Russian POV - for seeing Ukraine become Russia's geopolitical enemy.

I don't see Hitler "rising to power" as the actual root of the problem. I think the actual problem was that there was a whole generation of Germans who spent their early adulthood living in ugly trench warfare, and then they endured a horrible depression, for which they placed a lot of blame on banks siphoning money out of their country. 

If you compare the life that a kid born in 1901 in Germany to a Canadian born in 1968, like me, it's night and day. From 17-21 they were fighting in trenches, then they endured economic hardships and hunger unlike anything that we've ever seen here, and "banks" actually were partly to blame. Money that left Germany to go abroad all went through the banks. They actually were enemies of the German people, although that stems from the poor Armistice agreement and not the banks themselves.

From 17-21 I was mainly in our military but I never saw a shot fired in anger and I've never been hungry or out of work. I'm an extremely liberal person compared to a 1901-born German, but if I grew up in that set of circumstances I'd be a completely different person. Same planet, different level of international humanity. I grew up within a sea of humanity - I'm a product of it. 1901 Germans were not a product of humanity. It was other-worldly to them.

1935 Germany was rife with people who grew up murdering people in trenches, watching their friends get murdered, and then sat around hungry with their family, wondering where their next meal would come from, for ten solid years. it was a powderkeg just waiting for a spark. If it wasn't Adolf Hitler that rose to prominence there, I think that there were twenty thousand other Germans who would have been just as bad as he was. 

I think that Palestinians are the exact same as those Germans were. Not because of the Israelis, but because of the 20 muslim countries that insisted they stay there in refugee camps for 4 generations. At the end of the day though, Palestinians don't grow up hating the people they should hate. 

 

There is evidence that Hitler also was one of Khazarian fake Semites. 😀

 

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