Jump to content

Canadian Blocked At Border for Mental Illness Treatment


Recommended Posts

This is between us and our cops, whose transmission of their medical? 'notes' can be challenged, and I hope will be.

Understood, but you can't have it both ways. Police officers are criticized for not being trained or informed well enough for mental health domestic calls. Seems reasonable to keep track of suicide attempts for perps who would harm themselves and/or others. "Suicide by cop" is a well known behaviour.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 63
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Yes, one would think so. Her complaint mostly revolves around how such information was made available to border agents. But wouldn't she have to disclose it anyway if asked by agents about mental illness ? Or is that protected ?

A quick Google search would have revealed her suicide attempt and other mental illness treatments prior to the 2012 hospitalization, information she posted online voluntarily.

It sure as hell is protected. We have a medical system here in Canada that isn't so completely stupid as yours, ands respects people's privacy under law. The only reason your tourist business is doing well at all along the Canadian border is because you have legalized pot.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Derek L

It sure as hell is protected. We have a medical system here in Canada that isn't so completely stupid as yours, ands respects people's privacy under law. The only reason your tourist business is doing well at all along the Canadian border is because you have legalized pot.

Actually, Americans have greater enshrined rights to medical (and mental health) privacy then Canadians……..

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Actually, Americans have greater enshrined rights to medical (and mental health) privacy then Canadians……..

No you don't. Let me give you a little heads up on that. The only person that could legally ask you about a pre-existing condition in Canada is your doctor. No rep. of the provincial health care system, regardless of what province you are in, can ask such questions. It's called the "Canada Healthcare Act" It goes across the country as opposed to a helter skelter patchwork quilt by ACME insurance that wants to deny as many people coverage, for whatever reason, they can.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Derek L

No you don't. Let me give you a little heads up on that. The only person that could legally ask you about a pre-existing condition in Canada is your doctor. No rep. of the provincial health care system, regardless of what province you are in, can ask such questions. It's called the "Canada Healthcare Act" It goes across the country as opposed to a helter skelter patchwork quilt by ACME insurance that wants to deny as many people coverage, for whatever reason, they can.

No need to give me a "heads-up".......I understand both Canadian and American privacy laws........look no further then the HMHDB & NAMHR here, versus the above mentioned Americans rights and the associated legal pitfalls with implementing actual mental health history into the FBI’s NICS...........

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It sure as hell is protected. We have a medical system here in Canada that isn't so completely stupid as yours, ands respects people's privacy under law. The only reason your tourist business is doing well at all along the Canadian border is because you have legalized pot.

No, I'm pretty sure it was doing quite well for many reasons long before pot was "legalized". Let's see....cheaper gas...cigarettes...cheese...milk...lower taxes....warmer weather...more jobs...lower prices....you get the idea. Stories about medical privacy violations are easy to find in Canada, the most recent one being for medical marijuana users.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

... It's called the "Canada Healthcare Act" It goes across the country as opposed to a helter skelter patchwork quilt by ACME insurance that wants to deny as many people coverage, for whatever reason, they can.

Actually, there are many differences across the provinces. There is no standard across Canada.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This is between us and our cops, whose transmission of their medical? 'notes' can be challenged, and I hope will be.

But hey, Bush cheney is willing to take Rob Ford off our hands. Let's let him do that don't you think. Oh yeah, there is that "mental illness" issue that might come up at the border. Never mind the crackpipe issue!.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Actually, there are many differences across the provinces. There is no standard across Canada.

There are some differences as you point out. For instance a doctor may choose not to perform an abortion based on his/her religion/ethics. So a woman in Canada goes to a different doctor. The standard across Canada is called the Canada Health Care Act. Actually before that act came into being if you happen to say break your leg in Alberta but you lived in BC , you would have to pay the bill there and then bring it back home for reimbursement. CHA took care of that a long time ago. Now if you break your leg in Nfld and live in BC the paperwork gets taken care of behind the scenes and you hobble home none the worse for wear than if it happened in your backyard.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

No, I'm pretty sure it was doing quite well for many reasons long before pot was "legalized". Let's see....cheaper gas...cigarettes...cheese...milk...lower taxes....warmer weather...more jobs...lower prices....you get the idea. Stories about medical privacy violations are easy to find in Canada, the most recent one being for medical marijuana users.

Cheaper gas, sure, volume. cigarettes, I don't smoke, cheese and milk, again, volume. Lower taxes, nope. Weather, yep in certain lattitudes. Jobs-tourists don't go to get jobs. Lower prices? on some things like houses after the Bush banking disaster. I'll fly to Florida once in a while in the winter. Keep the rest.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

...CHA took care of that a long time ago. Now if you break your leg in Nfld and live in BC the paperwork gets taken care of behind the scenes and you hobble home none the worse for wear than if it happened in your backyard.

Nope...wrong again...as a recent CBC story highlighted medivac charges that will not be paid because her province (Quebec) does not participate, so the CHA does not apply to all of Canada the way you say it does. Hell, some provinces send people to "the states" !

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Nope...wrong again...as a recent CBC story highlighted medivac charges that will not be paid because her province (Quebec) does not participate, so the CHA does not apply to all of Canada the way you say it does. Hell, some provinces send people to "the states" !

I notice you completely disregarded the "pre-existing condition" issue. That's a BIG issue. Doesn't exist here. Can't throw you in the ditch here because of a "pre-existing condition"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I notice you completely disregarded the "pre-existing condition" issue. That's a BIG issue. Doesn't exist here. Can't throw you in the ditch here because of a "pre-existing condition"

Don't really care...I have better, cheaper health and dental insurance than you and quicker access to medical procedures and diagnostics. I have no idea what a "wait list" is, but you do. Good luck with that.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Don't really care...I have better, cheaper health and dental insurance than you and quicker access to medical procedures and diagnostics. I have no idea what a "wait list" is, but you do. Good luck with that.

No, you don't. And if you happen to be unlucky enough to need a helicopter medevac flight (and I hope you never do) you might fly an extra twenty minutes getting to a hospital of "credit card" choice rather than one of best choice in terms of care. That's one "wait list" we don't have here. No need. All under one credit card.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Derek L

Don't really care...I have better, cheaper health and dental insurance than you and quicker access to medical procedures and diagnostics. I have no idea what a "wait list" is, but you do. Good luck with that.

And from a healthcare professional’s perspective, there is bucket’s more money to be made down South…….My wife (an orthodontist) makes ~250k a year (in a partnered practice) with specialized, somewhat unique training up here, but has been offered several positions in the States at private clinics, all in the 500-600k range, treating bruxism and performing cosmetic work (less demanding, per her)…..
Of course, dentistry in Canada, unlike general medical healthcare, like the States still belongs in the Free Market Nexus…….at the end of the day, the ratio of Americans with dental insurance is still greater then Canadians with dental insurance, and till recently, Canadians “didn’t have to pay” for our “free healthcare”, unlike Americans…….You Yanks sure don't mind paying for your own physical well being.
God Bless America……and we’re agnostic ;)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

.....Of course, dentistry in Canada, unlike general medical healthcare, like the States still belongs in the Free Market Nexus…….at the end of the day, the ratio of Americans with dental insurance is still greater then Canadians with dental insurance, and till recently, Canadians “didn’t have to pay” for our “free healthcare”, unlike Americans…….You Yanks sure don't mind paying for your own physical well being.

Don't mind at all, but I think a significant point is often lost on many Canadians bragging about their "free healthcare" compared to "the states". My employer pays most of my insurance premiums for healthcare, dental, and vision, leaving me to pay a modest portion (about $95 per month) . These healthcare benefits are not taxed as income. Repeat the scenario for my spouse's coverage, paid by her employer, doubling down for the entire family. We are over-insured !

I have never really been able to find out exactly how much Canadians pay each year for their "free healthcare" in each province, but it's gotta be thousands of dollars depending on income level and taxes.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Don't mind at all, but I think a significant point is often lost on many Canadians bragging about their "free healthcare" compared to "the states". My employer pays most of my insurance premiums for healthcare, dental, and vision, leaving me to pay a modest portion (about $95 per month) . These healthcare benefits are not taxed as income. Repeat the scenario for my spouse's coverage, paid by her employer, doubling down for the entire family. We are over-insured !

I have never really been able to find out exactly how much Canadians pay each year for their "free healthcare" in each province, but it's gotta be thousands of dollars depending on income level and taxes.

Well now it becomes even more obvious of how ilttle you know of Canadian health care. I don't know how good your math is, but does $64/month come into thousands? There are provinces where you pay nothing per month. Having said that, nobody is dumb enough to think that health care is funded from a huge hole in the ground that spews money as needed. No, it's paid for by tax revenues, as is yours. Ours is just fairer.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well now it becomes even more obvious of how ilttle you know of Canadian health care. I don't know how good your math is, but does $64/month come into thousands?

Yes, it does when other taxes are directed at "free health care". And you don't get dental, vision, or pharma coverage from the CHA. Provinces vary wildly for premiums, taxes, and covered procedures. Some just send patients to the U.S.

http://www.snopes.com/politics/medical/canada.asp

"Fair" doesn't mean a damn thing when waiting months for simple health care procedures. How long did this woman have to wait for a shrink after attempting suicide ?

Edited by bush_cheney2004
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, it does when other taxes are directed at "free health care". And you don't get dental, vision, or pharma coverage from the CHA. Provinces vary wildly for premiums, taxes, and covered procedures. Some just send patients to the U.S.

http://www.snopes.com/politics/medical/canada.asp

"Fair" doesn't mean a damn thing when waiting months for simple health care procedures. How long did this woman have to wait for a shrink after attempting suicide ?

I assume you read the underlying notes on this article? They pretty much debunk your argument.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Unfortunately, your content contains terms that we do not allow. Please edit your content to remove the highlighted words below.
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Tell a friend

    Love Repolitics.com - Political Discussion Forums? Tell a friend!
  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
      10,751
    • Most Online
      1,403

    Newest Member
    Betsy Smith
    Joined
  • Recent Achievements

    • wwef235 earned a badge
      Week One Done
    • phoenyx75 went up a rank
      Apprentice
    • User went up a rank
      Mentor
    • NakedHunterBiden earned a badge
      One Month Later
    • Videospirit earned a badge
      One Month Later
  • Recently Browsing

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...