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Gas vs Electrical Stoves


Gas vs Electrical Stoves  

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Americans are drawing battle lines over their appliance of choice it seems. 

Here is what happened: 

---> Last Monday, a member of the Consumer Product Safety Commission said that he had not ruled out banning gas stoves due to their health and environmental risks.

---> Two days later, the agency chair clarified that it was not planning a ban but confirmed that ongoing research might eventually prompt higher safety standards. This did little to dampen concern. 

(WP)

Twitter went crazy and Musk probably made some money. 😃

The gas vs electric debate went tribal and viral. So, will make a poll. 

gas-vs-electric_2.png?fmt=png-alpha&qlt=85,0&resMode=sharp2&op_usm=1.75,0.3,2,0&scl=1&constrain=fit,1

Edited by Contrarian
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Gas is much better than traditional coil electric stoves, but induction electric is another big jump in performance over gas. It's more efficient, less polluting, safer, heats faster, cools faster, cleans easier and is more even. It can boil a pot of water about 3x as fast.

I suspect many people have not yet experienced these modern electrics, which will see your poll, but based on performance there really isn't any debate

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2 hours ago, Hodad said:

Gas is much better than traditional coil electric stoves, but induction electric is another big jump in performance over gas. It's more efficient, less polluting, safer, heats faster, cools faster, cleans easier and is more even. It can boil a pot of water about 3x as fast.

I suspect many people have not yet experienced these modern electrics, which will see your poll, but based on performance there really isn't any debate

Yes induction is good but only on cookware that contains a large percentage of iron,

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17 minutes ago, Legato said:

Yes induction is good but only on cookware that contains a large percentage of iron,

That's true, but also not really a barrier. No shortage of induction-compatible cookware in all shapes, sizes and finishes. Most of the good stuff was already ferrous. Even most of the mass-market stuff is being made introduction-ready with iron discs in the base. No compromises needed.

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The Washington Post had an article comparing the different types of stoves: 

So what do you need to know about the differences between gas, traditional electric and induction cooktops? 

How they work

Gas: Gas stoves rely on a combustible mixture of oxygen and gas that flows more or less depending on how you turn the control knob. The cookware is heated by the open flame.

Traditional electric: Also known as radiant cooktops, these appliances rely on the slow process of conducting heat from a coil to the cookware. Those coils may be exposed, as you’ll find in older models, or under a smooth ceramic glass surface.

Induction: Induction cooktops employ copper coils under the ceramic to create a magnetic field that sends pulses into the cookware. This causes the electrons in the pot or pan to move faster, resulting in heat.

---> Safety and climate impact

Gas: This is the crux of the bans being enacted and considered. “When a gas stove is on, it releases not only fine pieces of particulate matter that can invade the lungs, but also nitrogen dioxide, carbon monoxide and formaldehyde — all of which have been linked to various health risks,” Osaka writes. In terms of climate impact, more gas hookups make it that much harder to move away from fossil fuels. And research shows that gas stoves emit the greenhouse gas methane. As far as other safety issues, the open flames and accessible knobs of gas stoves can be of special concern for households with small children and pets.

Traditional electric: Traditional electric models don’t emit indoor pollutants. Because of the heat coming off the coils, though, anything in contact with the burners can start to get hot or even catch fire. Most electric homes still rely on fossil fuels but leave open the possibility for a shift to renewable energy sources.

Induction: Like traditional electric, induction cooktops release no indoor pollutants, and in the future, they may be fueled by renewable energy. These cooktops don’t get very hot, as they heat only compatible cookware, although some residual warmth from the cookware can be transferred back into the ceramic surface.

In defense of the electric stovetop, the surface most American home cooks use

---> Responsiveness and heat maintenance

Gas: Gas stoves are very responsive, easily moving between temperatures. You can see it as the flame shrinks or grows as you turn the knob. Gas does pretty well maintaining a simmer, Consumer Reports notes, but is not as steady in general as electric.

Traditional electric: Traditional electric models typically take longer to heat up or cool down. Because of the potential for residual heat, you sometimes run the risk of burning foods when switching from high to low heat, which is why some experts recommend switching burners if you need to drop the temperature quickly. Once you get to that lower temp, though, Consumer Reports says electric ranges in general excel at maintaining a simmer.

Induction: Similar to gas, induction cooktops are very responsive to changes in the heat setting. Consumer Reports finds that water boils 20 to 40 percent faster than it does on the best gas or electric burners. Induction maintains a simmer well; however, you may find yourself needing to use a slightly higher temp than you’re used to, as induction is so responsive that a low setting can be cooler than you expect.

How an electric cooktop is changing the way one food writer tests and writes recipes

---> Cleaning

Gas: Gas stoves can be a bear to clean, thanks to the grates and cavities underneath.

Traditional electric: Radiant models with exposed burners pose some of the same challenges as gas cooktops in terms of cleaning. Ceramic cooktops are much simpler to wipe down, though the residual heat means you may get more food burned onto the surface after spills.

Induction: Induction cooktops are just as easy to clean as other ceramic-topped models. You’re less likely to have to deal with food encrusted on the surface since they don’t get nearly as hot.

---> Price

Gas: This applies to all types of stoves: You can find models across a wide range of price points, and the most expensive options are not always the best. Price depends on where you live and your retailer, so it pays to shop around. If you’re looking for a point of reference, Consumer Reports recently released its list of top-performing ranges of all types for this year. The No. 1 gas model from LG goes for $1,698 to $2,447.

Traditional electric: These are more often among the lowest-priced stoves, though not across the board. The favorite from Consumer Reports is made by LG and runs from $698 to $1,299.

Induction: While a high-end induction model may be two or more times the price of a comparable gas or traditional electric option, at the entry level you can find induction cooktops for less than $1,000, putting them more in line with other ranges. A Frigidaire that goes for $1,093 to $1,549 was the third-place induction range from Consumer Reports, while the top-ranking model from LG comes in at $2,298 to $3,500.

Especially if you are switching from gas to induction (or traditional electric), you have to consider the price of changing your lines and other hardware, although there are some government incentives that can help cover the cost of the appliance and the conversion. If you don’t have cookware that is induction compatible, that would be an additional cost, though many common pans, including cast-iron, some stainless steel and some nonstick, already are. (You can always confirm by seeing whether a magnet sticks to the bottom of the pan.) Aluminum, pure copper, glass and ceramic are not.

While induction is more energy-efficient than older gas or electric stoves because the direct transfer of energy means no heat is lost to the air, keep your energy bill expectations in check, Paul Hope, the home and appliance editor at Consumer Reports, told me. You may see modest savings but nothing dramatic, especially as cooking appliances account for only about 2 percent of your household energy usage.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/food/2023/01/11/gas-stoves-electric-induction-compare/

Edited by Contrarian
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On 1/16/2023 at 9:25 AM, Contrarian said:

Americans are drawing battle lines over their appliance of choice it seems. 

Here is what happened: 

---> Last Monday, a member of the Consumer Product Safety Commission said that he had not ruled out banning gas stoves due to their health and environmental risks.

---> Two days later, the agency chair clarified that it was not planning a ban but confirmed that ongoing research might eventually prompt higher safety standards. This did little to dampen concern. 

(WP)

Twitter went crazy and Musk probably made some money. 😃

The gas vs electric debate went tribal and viral. So, will make a poll. 

gas-vs-electric_2.png?fmt=png-alpha&qlt=85,0&resMode=sharp2&op_usm=1.75,0.3,2,0&scl=1&constrain=fit,1

I prefer cooking with gas, although I've cooked on induction and didn't notice much difference.

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DeSantis is getting involved in the stoves war 😃

DeSantis said he is considering removing taxes on Gas Stoves in Florida.

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26 minutes ago, Aristides said:

I don't know what it is with DeSantis. I can't help but think if it were up to him we would still be using leaded gasoline.

If it would annoy liberals, he'd subsidize lead paint tomorrow. Doing stupid things to make his base (base in every sense) giddy seems to be his thing.

From maliciously sending migrants to unprepared cities to "don't say gay" to incentivizing gas stoves, it's all the political equivalent of diesel truck drivers who "roll coal" when they spot an EV.

It's the shallow, childish politics of spite, and 40% of the country is loving (or at least tolerating) it. Say what you will about Democrats, they are still a party with a vision for the future and values beyond sticking it to the other guys.

Edited by Hodad
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DiSantos is a knee-jerk fool, like all those equating warnings to banning them.

I'd love to have a gas stove, as I love cooking in a wok. But they cost more, are forever appliances and you can smell them. I was impressed with induction but I never use the damn thing we bought, the air fryer's become my best friend.

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On 1/16/2023 at 10:38 PM, Hodad said:

Gas is much better than traditional coil electric stoves, but induction electric is another big jump in performance over gas. It's more efficient, less polluting, safer, heats faster, cools faster, cleans easier and is more even. It can boil a pot of water about 3x as fast.

I suspect many people have not yet experienced these modern electrics, which will see your poll, but based on performance there really isn't any debate

Modern induction is crazy good(also another excuse not to use those ceramic cookware :D )

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