Jump to content

vehicle insurance


treehugger

Recommended Posts

Guess what province has the cheapest car insurance.

Why Quebec of course.

Guess who pays the most.

Why Ontario then B.C then Manitoba.

The biggest racket is in the Brampton area where the place is full of scammers including doctors who are in on the scams. It is rampant there and costing billions of dollars.

The scammers cause accidents etc etc, you have heard it before.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Don't BC and Manitoba both have public insurance?

Yes, but there are different surveys that show different things in regards to the cost:

http://www.leaderpost.com/business/blasts+Fraser+Institute+study/5496284/story.html

Any study be the Fraser institute is next to useless. Even this survey though, had Quebec (public insurance) with the lowest cost).

Mohindra conceded coverage and benefits are not included in the Fraser Institute study. “Our study looks strictly at affordability. We don’t look at coverage. We look at whether the average individual afford insurance and what is the cost to that individual.”

Read more: http://www.leaderpost.com/business/blasts+Fraser+Institute+study/5496284/story.html#ixzz1a2HouzMv

Edited by Smallc
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guess what province has the cheapest car insurance.

Why Quebec of course.

Guess who pays the most.

Why Ontario then B.C then Manitoba.

The biggest racket is in the Brampton area where the place is full of scammers including doctors who are in on the scams. It is rampant there and costing billions of dollars.

The scammers cause accidents etc etc, you have heard it before.

Billions is hyperbole....

]

As far as Brampton is concerned many insurance companies quietly advise brokers they will not write in that area.

And Brampton is a very rich place!

Perhaps now you are understanding why the new rules came into effect September 1st of last year.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It was clearly a very shady survey with a methodology that was fixed to provide data that would make public insurance appear more expensive than it is. It's not surprising that the Fraser Institute would do that, and even less surprising that some of the more naive posters on this forum would fall for it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think Nova Scotia's Finance minster put it best when Asked what he thought of the Fraser institute ranking his province amongst the best in Canada. ""It is not a serious institution. It is a political organization and it is no accident that their focus is on the Ontario election. They're trying to make themselves relevant to the Ontario election."Just because they say something doesn't make it true and even if it is true it isn't because they have actually done real work it is because it helps their political agenda. Wouldn't read a study by them if you paid me.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think Nova Scotia's Finance minster put it best when Asked what he thought of the Fraser institute ranking his province amongst the best in Canada. ""It is not a serious institution. It is a political organization and it is no accident that their focus is on the Ontario election. They're trying to make themselves relevant to the Ontario election."Just because they say something doesn't make it true and even if it is true it isn't because they have actually done real work it is because it helps their political agenda. Wouldn't read a study by them if you paid me.

Yeah, it isn't like the Nova Scotia Finance Minister is a senior member of his own 'political organization' or anything like that........

Is he an Independent?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The "average" rates in Alberta, Sask, Ontario, Manitoba and BC are all within a couple hundred bucks per year of each other, according to this study.

And this study doesn't take in to account minimum liability that must be purchased, how rates are affected by no-fault claims, as well as other factors.

So despite the fact that this study isn't comparing apples to apples, the results are very similar in most of the larger provinces, other than Quebec.

I can't find a study that actually compares similar coverages, similar ages in similarly populated areas. Anyone know of a study that actually compares apples to apples accross provinces?

I have anecdotal evidence that in Alberta, young people have much higher insurance rates than their counterparts in BC. While more experienced drivers with clean records pay less in Alberta. But I would like to see a proper comparison.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I can't find a study that actually compares similar coverages, similar ages in similarly populated areas. Anyone know of a study that actually compares apples to apples accross provinces?

This may help , but its dated now.

http://www.consumer.ca/pdfs/030827_report.pdf

and older...

http://www.consumer.ca/pdfs/010808_report.pdf

Edited by guyser
Link to comment
Share on other sites

.

And this study doesn't take in to account minimum liability that must be purchased, how rates are affected by no-fault claims, as well as other factors.

Largely irrelevant. Min liability is just that, minimum and no one,at least not a broker will sell that unless forced at gunpoint since it guarentees a lawsuit in the long run.

No Fault insurance is not the same as no fault claims. "Fault " assigment is the word you are looking for.

Fault is always assigned using thr fault chart.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Largely irrelevant. Min liability is just that, minimum and no one,at least not a broker will sell that unless forced at gunpoint since it guarentees a lawsuit in the long run.

No Fault insurance is not the same as no fault claims. "Fault " assigment is the word you are looking for.

Fault is always assigned using thr fault chart.

Thanks for the links. Seems the Fraser Institute is probably out to lunch on this study. Their methodology seems to be flawed.

You're right about the terminology that I was using. Thanks for the correction.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for the links. Seems the Fraser Institute is probably out to lunch on this study. Their methodology seems to be flawed.

You're right about the terminology that I was using. Thanks for the correction.

You are welcome. I have asked fopr more recent studies and when I get a n asnwer I will let ya know

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guess what province has the cheapest car insurance.

Why Quebec of course.

Did your comparison include the vehicle/driver license cost?

In Quebec, private insurance only covers physical damage to you or anyone else. State insurance paid through licensing fees covers personal damage. Licensing fees are high. (I think that in Manitoba, gasoline taxes cover some of these fees.)

More pointedly in Quebec, the personal damage is limited. In Quebec, if you hit a graduating medical student with 3 young kids and put her in a wheel chair for life, she and her kids will receive about $100,000 annually. She has no civil recourse.

Edited by August1991
Link to comment
Share on other sites

More pointedly in Quebec, the personal damage is limited. In Quebec, if you hit a graduating medical student with 3 young kids and put her in a wheel chair for life, she and her kids will receive about $100,000 annually. She has no civil recourse.

Dumb dumb dumb but if that is what they want, fine.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dunmb dumb dumb but if that is what they want, fine.
Wait a second, guyser.

At 9 am, a driver gets in his car in Massachusetts and then makes a mistake. He injures a young woman. A long court case ensues.

At 9 am, a driver gets in his car in Quebec and then makes a mistake. He injures a young woman. The question goes to a State tribunal.

----

Some twists: Does it matter if the woman is a doctor? Has children?

Does it matter if the car is a BMW X5, and the driver a partner on Wall Street?

Edited by August1991
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Largely irrelevant. Min liability is just that, minimum and no one,at least not a broker will sell that unless forced at gunpoint since it guarentees a lawsuit in the long run.

They do it all the time in BC. I buy the ICBC minimum from a broker because I have to and then buy additional liability from a private company not using the same broker.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

They do it all the time in BC. I buy the ICBC minimum from a broker because I have to and then buy additional liability from a private company not using the same broker.

....which means you dont have minimum liability.

I suspect with prov run insurance it occurs more as they are legally exhonarated from E+O claims

Link to comment
Share on other sites

They do it all the time in BC. I buy the ICBC minimum from a broker because I have to and then buy additional liability from a private company not using the same broker.
What? I do the same in Quebec but it's for personal liability insurance while driving outside of Quebec. Within Quebec, my private insurer only covers physical damage to me or anyone else. (State insurance covers all personal-injury liabilities for accidents in Quebec.) Outside of Quebec, my private insurer must cover all costs. As a result, when I renew coverage, there are many questions about my driving habits and in particular, how often I drive to the US.
Yes it matters. Yes it matters

No it doesnt matter. No it doesnt matter.

Where would you like to go with this?

Well, if I understand you properly, you are in effect saying that the victim's status in life matters but the status of the person causing the accident does not. By that standard of justice, I should go to prison if I steal a $10 bottle of wine from a Mom & Pop store but I should get a suspended sentence if I steal a $10 pair of gloves from the Bay.

Alternatively, Conrad Black should only go to prison for 3 days whereas a homeless guy convicted of theft/perjury should go to prison for 3 years. (Compare the loss of income/reputation of Conrad Black and the homeless guy.)

IOW guyser, your sense of justice is odd. You consider the victim's loss but you don't consider the penalty to the guilty party.

----

At this point, maybe we should start a thread in the moral philosophy category....

Edited by August1991
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, if I understand you properly, you are in effect saying that the victim's status in life matters but the status of the person causing the accident does not. By that standard of justice, I should go to prison if I steal a $10 bottle of wine from a Mom & Pop store but I should get a suspended sentence if I steal a $10 pair of gloves from the Bay.

I am guessing you dont understand me.

The theft you reference is $10 , doesnt matter where it comes from, it is still $10.

Of course the victims status counts, they are the injured party afterall and if you injure someone making $1M a year, you bet you are sued for damages commensurate, aftyerall, you will be preventing them from making that money.(of course other factors come into play)

Alternatively, Conrad Black should only go to prison for 3 days whereas a homeless guy convicted of theft/perjury should go to prison for 3 years. (Compare the loss of income/reputation of Conrad Black and the homeless guy.)

You are comparing criminal law to civil law as respects an auto accident.

Apples and oranges and not relevant.

IOW guyser, your sense of justice is odd. You consider the victim's loss but you don't consider the penalty to the guilty party.

See above....criminal vs civil

----

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Tell a friend

    Love Repolitics.com - Political Discussion Forums? Tell a friend!
×
×
  • Create New...