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Ft Hood Terror Attack


DogOnPorch

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DoP

Didn't Islamic armies sweep across the face of the planet during the early Middle-Ages? Of course they did. Re: Protestant's and Catholics: sure they were all bastards...you relativist. Two wrongs don't make a right....and again...I'm not a Christian. Nor am I Jewish...or what have you. Religion is myth. Might as well start reading sheep entrails and dropping the first born into the fire.

Ok, so you're not Christian or Jewish but still you want to focus on the Muslim religion for some reason. Why is that ?

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Does this Muslim guy who killed 13 people represent Islam as much as the Jewish guy who killed 29 people at a mosque, represents Judaism?

What do you say DogOnPorch? jbg?

Jews committing massacres is newsworthy and rare. Sort of man bites dog. The opposite, dog bites man, is not news.

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I am still trying to get over jbg's comment of "Sudden Jihad Syndrome". It sounds like Glenn Beck is channeling through some people on this board.

That came from Daniel Pipes, much more rational than Glenn Beck.
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Just like some Christians would disagree that killing doctors is bad or many other groups who express stupid behaviour and then group themselves under a certain religion.

There can be violent fanatics in any religion. It just seems to be that for every violent Christian fanatic there are ten thousand violent Muslim fanatics.

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The problem is not that they volunteered, and should know whats going to happen, but that they don't appear to be getting the support they need to deal with the stress of extended/ repeated tours. The number of suicides for soldiers is also quite high, something which the media does not mention very often.

Soldiers Mental Health Under Strain

"You people don't listen," the Iraqi war vet said, as two clinicians followed her down the hall to the elevators.

"Sophia," one of them said.

Taylor was trembling and wiping tears from her face.

"Stop talking to me," she said. "This ward ain't gonna change until everyone else in the freakin' Army dies. You people don't listen to me. I'm tired of talking."

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I don't know if I actually have an opinion on that. But I will say that most of the violence from Islam is comming from Saudi Arabia. I advocated slamming them down before places like Afghanistan or Iraq.. even Iran. Yet for some reason the House of Saud is welcomed in the USA complete with red carpet. If Islam and Muslims are responsible for 9/11, Saudi Arabia should be the first target.

I agree. In a sense, Saudi Arabia is the biggest sponsor of Islamic terrorism in the world by a very, very long shot. It's government funds vicious, violent religious schools and its individual "princes" funnel money to Islamic terrorist groups all over the world.

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DoP

Ok, you explain it then ? Why do you consistently focus on the comments of the fringe and try to represent that as the views of all Muslims ?

The problem with the Islamic world is that vicious, hateful commentary is not confined to the fringes. You can get it straight and undiluated from some of their most important religious, political and media figures.

Iran's president is a Holocaust denier. So is Sudan's. The schoolbooks, newspapers and other media throughout the Muslim world have some of the nastiest crap about other religions you'll ever see this side of a KKK website.

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Let's see... a religion that includes 1.5 billion people, including progressive Western people,

Define for me, if you will, what you consider to be the polical outlook of "progressive western people".

Does it include putting homosexuals into prison and constraints on the kind of work women can do and the rights they have? Does it include banning abortion and executing abortion doctors?

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What about people like Mr. Karzai, then. He is a muslim, and he sometimes meets with Mr. Obama or other western leaders.

Should we be fearful that he may erupt into sudden jihad syndrome, and attack our leaders?

Karzai would attack his own mother if he thought there was profit or political advantage in it.

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Karzai would attack his own mother if he thought there was profit or political advantage in it.

Perhaps. But is that because he is a muslim, or just on a ruthless quest for power? Would he be susceptible to the "sudden jihad syndrome" that apparently any muslim could suddenly go off like a bomb and attack all western infidels within their grasp?

It's an important question... after all there are muslims in parliament, and maybe in the US congress too.

Even Obama has muslim roots, and he's got access to the shiny red button, so...

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Argus,

Define for me, if you will, what you consider to be the polical outlook of "progressive western people".

Does it include putting homosexuals into prison and constraints on the kind of work women can do and the rights they have? Does it include banning abortion and executing abortion doctors?

If you're going to load your questions, then please answer them yourself.

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I am taking a lot of heat for quoting the article linked and excerted below, particularly over the highlighted language:

This is what I have dubbed the
Sudden Jihad Syndrome
, whereby normal-appearing Muslims abruptly become violent. It has the awful but legitimate consequence of casting suspicion on all Muslims. Who knows whence the next jihadi? How can one be confident a law-abiding Muslim will not suddenly erupt in a homicidal rage? Yes, of course, their numbers are very small, but they are disproportionately much higher than among non-Muslims.

I want to emphasize that I did not write the article nor do I subscribe to it 100% or even close. I threw it out there for discussion since it seemed like a partial reasonable explanation.

I have taken flack both from posters I respect, such as AW, and those for whom I have no respect, such as Naomiglover.

One should be allwoed to quote an article without people jumping to the conclusion that one buys everything it says.

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Guest American Woman
I want to emphasize that I did not write the article nor do I subscribe to it 100% or even close. I threw it out there for discussion since it seemed like a partial reasonable explanation.

I have taken flack both from posters I respect, such as AW, and those for whom I have no respect, such as Naomiglover.

One should be allwoed to quote an article without people jumping to the conclusion that one buys everything it says.

You didn't get any flack from me; I simply pointed out the fact that, and I quote, I didn't even read the "Sudden Jihad Syndrome" comment.... (and I still haven't read that post), and similarly, I have not jumped to any conclusions.

Edited by American Woman
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Guest American Woman

Interesting comment:

His fellow students complained to the faculty about Hasan's "anti-American propaganda," but said a fear of appearing discriminatory against a Muslim student kept officers from filing a formal complaint.

How far do we go not to "appear discriminatory?" Do we actually have to protect people who could potentially cause harm for fear of being accused of being discriminatory? Seems to me if there's a good reason to question something/someone, "discrimination" shouldn't even be a factor.

Edited by American Woman
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You didn't get any flack from me; I simply pointed out the fact that, and I quote, I didn't even read the "Sudden Jihad Syndrome" comment.... (and I still haven't read that post), and similarly, I have not jumped to any conclusions.

That's fair.

Your post just above this one and below the one discussing my post adequately lays out my actual views, not the "Sudden Jihad" article. I think that there is too much reluctance to challenge a Muslim, based on a view that the challenger will be seen as prejudiced. I think that a Muslim's actions should be challenged as much as mine would be if they appear dangerous or alarming.

Edited by jbg
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Argus,

I'm going to jump ahead a bit and anticipate some of the discussion that will come down by saying that sudden religious fervor needs to be a profiled behavior in the military. Of course hindsight is 20/20 as they say but it's hard not to think that someone in this person's circle must not have seen flags around his behavior.

....For which he was being treated...of course. Another success story for big pharma.

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Just a quick opinion I'd like to share: I don't think the fact that Major Hasan was a religious Muslim should have raised any alarms. I mean that, I am dead serious. There is nothing about being a religious Muslim that I find concerning or worrying. When combined with his openly spewed anti-American rhetoric, however, it paints a clear picture of a liability and a person that needs to be swiftly removed from his position. He openly equated the war on terror with a war on Islam (and extremist and absurd position, and extremely worrying because he himself was a devout Muslim). He justified suicide bombings and spoke favourably of America's enemies. He expressed strong concerns about being deployed and having to fight against what he perceived were fellow Muslims (he perceives our enemies as his people!). All of this information (and there is MUCH more information painting a picture of this man as an extremist left-wing religious ideologue) should have had him removed from his position and investigated thoroughly long ago. This tragedy was 100% preventable.

Allow me to reiterate my main point: being a devout Muslim is absolutely fine and should not worry anyone on its own... but when combined with extremist political opinions/perspectives, it paints a picture of a would-be domestic terrorist. Let's see this story for what it is, and look at the entire picture.

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Interesting comment:

His fellow students complained to the faculty about Hasan's "anti-American propaganda," but said a fear of appearing discriminatory against a Muslim student kept officers from filing a formal complaint.

How far do we go not to "appear discriminatory?" Do we actually have to protect people who could potentially cause harm for fear of being accused of being discriminatory? Seems to me if there's a good reason to question something/someone, "discrimination" shouldn't even be a factor.

Sometimes people are hardly to go to action just for overhearing a person who says something.

I remember many years ago I overheard a conversation of two of my neighbour standing just behind me in an elevator. One fat old lady told another that she felt headache and could not sleep last night but not showed any syndrome of catching a cold. I happened just read an article of a doctor said that people should take the "uncaused" headache which was just the same as she described seriously, because it may indicate the sign of cerebral thrombosis. For a time I thought I should warn her, but I barely knew her and I was not in the conversation. Isn't it rude to break into other people's talke and told her what I thought especially I was not a doctor? How many people would end up with stroke after they complained headache? When I was lost in such consideration, the elevator reached her floor and she went out. Several days later, another neighbour told me she was in the hospital and I saw her came back with an armchair a month later, and she had never left the armchair again. Up til now I'm still unsure whether I sould warn her regardless any other considerations. :unsure:

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Interesting comment:

His fellow students complained to the faculty about Hasan's "anti-American propaganda," but said a fear of appearing discriminatory against a Muslim student kept officers from filing a formal complaint.

How far do we go not to "appear discriminatory?" Do we actually have to protect people who could potentially cause harm for fear of being accused of being discriminatory? Seems to me if there's a good reason to question something/someone, "discrimination" shouldn't even be a factor.

I agree with you 100%. This obsession among some people to never come across as possibly controversial, this ultra-sensitivity, is a huge problem among many in our culture. I have no regrets about rubbing many of my co-workers and managers over the years the wrong way. Complicity and apathy are pathetic character traits.

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Interesting comment:

His fellow students complained to the faculty about Hasan's "anti-American propaganda," but said a fear of appearing discriminatory against a Muslim student kept officers from filing a formal complaint.

How far do we go not to "appear discriminatory?" Do we actually have to protect people who could potentially cause harm for fear of being accused of being discriminatory? Seems to me if there's a good reason to question something/someone, "discrimination" shouldn't even be a factor.

Being a Muslim seems to be a good reason to question someone. At least that seems to be the opinion of some of the posters in this thread who will not miss an opportunity to generalize and stereotype Muslims into one group of terror loving psychopaths.

That's discrimination.

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Being a Muslim seems to be a good reason to question someone. At least that seems to be the opinion of some of the posters in this thread who will not miss an opportunity to generalize and stereotype Muslims into one group of terror loving psychopaths.

That's discrimination.

A supposedly moderate professor from a country supposedly friendly to the United States...with a rather un-moderate view-point. While millions of Muslims are not like him, I notice the audience applauds what he has to say.

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