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Showing content with the highest reputation on 07/22/2021 in all areas

  1. There are good points made on both sides here - yes, trauma can and does affect a family for generations. It takes a lot of work to pull oneself out of those circumstances. Some Natives do pull themselves out, using the resources provided by the government. I do feel more of them could do more to help themselves. Case in point - a friend of mine who grew up on the Fort McKay reserve in N. Alberta. I met her in college when we were both in our 40's and we got to be good friends until her death last year. She told me that growing up - she knew she did not want a life on the reserve, did not want to raise her children there. She said, as soon as she was able (age 18), she got out, went to college and worked for 15 years on site in the oilsands as a heavy hauler. She met and married a non-Native, had one child and adopted a child from Nunavut. I met her in college when she was again using her indigenous rights to education to make a career change. At no time did she feel she had to give up her identity as an indigenous person to achieve any of this. It can be done. I just feel with all the "perks" offered by the government to Natives - why aren't more of them taking advantage of it? If I was offered free education, I'd be on that in a heartbeat. But again, not everyone has the determination and self-awareness to pull themselves up. I'm glad my friend did. I miss her strength and wisdom a lot.
    2 points
  2. Whoa, politics has always been for entertainment. It is our national sport. The Russians and Americans may be able to rival us at hockey, but nobody is better at politics than we are.
    2 points
  3. Then our communist-style government, along with their media lapdogs, took total control of the narrative and tried to act like all of our covid came from Europe. "Look, we have some fake science that says so!" Over 26,000 people died here 'from covid' but Canadian liberals are so stupid that they think the government fought covid effectively. By comparison, Japan has several times our population, their density is 100x higher than ours, and somehow we have 66% more c19 deaths than they do. Hmmmmm.
    1 point
  4. growing for now it will not too long in the future be shrinking that's a fact
    1 point
  5. The population of the globe was growing in 2020 at above 1% annual rate. It's a fact.
    1 point
  6. You've identified a good portion of the problem Goddess . . . . below is another small portion. There are generations of folks 'on reserve' that just don't have any concept of the personal pride and benefit that can be achieved with dropping the 'victim status' and partaking of mainstream Canadian society. Many of these folks don't have any idea of the personal responsibility of holding down a job, of looking after your family. We refer to the status card as the 'entitlement ticket' . . . . The native guys that leave reserve and get into the workforce, pay taxes, drop the 'victim mentality' and compete for the better jobs would never consider going back to that mindset . . that everybody 'owes' them. Trudeau and his ilk encourage the 'victim mentality' for his personal political reasons. Not a good situation.
    1 point
  7. Higher than 1% annual growth, factual. Rate of increase has not halved in half a century. Only two options as always: admit the reality; or ignore it and create a different one. Mind and electronic media are perfect instruments for that: just think it; just type.
    1 point
  8. The problem is that natives on many reserves have no reason to live. There are no jobs nor the prospect of jobs. They get up and do what every day? Drink, smoke, do drugs, have sex? Hang around? They've lost the habit/culture of working. This is not an aspect of residential schools. You can see the same in American slums. People need a reason to live, to get up in the morning. They need responsibilities. The reserves are not places to grow and thrive. They are places to molder. And having a bunch of lefties oozing sympathy and telling them 'we feel your pain' and 'we're so sorry for being the cause of everything' is not helpful. It just gives people on the reserves an out. It's not THEIR fault. It's the fault of white people! Therefor it's up to white people to solve their problems! But that's not going to happen. The natives need to get involved, need to find a way to either make their reserves economically self supporting - at least to get jobs for most of those who want them - or they need to transition to other locations where jobs can be found for them.
    1 point
  9. If Caucasian western culture is such a cesspool, why are all the third world despots crawling over each other to get here to immediately whine about being singled out? Those refugee barges go both ways.
    1 point
  10. From southern Alberta too. Can wear a moccasin or cowboy boot . . . . they both fit.
    1 point
  11. I don’t even know the words to the national anthem. They’ve been changed four times in my lifetime and I believe a fifth change is coming if I recall. I find this a national embarrassment and frankly I don’t even care anymore. Speaking of change, I’d get rid of the Lester Pearson Liberal Party logo flag of 1965 and return to Canada’s proper flag, the Red Ensign. That is the correct flag my grandfather was wounded under in France in WW1 and under-which I myself was born - in Alberta of course. 😎
    1 point
  12. Speaking of “native culture”, I wrote to APTN and asked about their annual operating budget and what is the source of their funding. I received acknowledgement of my inquiry and await answers - if I ever get them. I expect they are almost entirely funded by tax dollars to prop up their “culture” and make them feel good. We shall see, which I highly doubt.
    1 point
  13. The photo is silent testimony to what is going on here and what may be coming, for you. Man in Queensland escapes his stay-at-home prison order. No reason was given why he did it. Chivatos immediately re-captured him. He does not have covid-19.
    1 point
  14. China is below replacement rate at 1.7 children per woman and dropping India is just above replacement rate at 2.2 children per woman and dropping as for countries in Africa and the Middle East, children per woman is dropping fast and will follow the pattern of India and China all major western European nations are below replacement rate and dropping the only major western country that is above replacement rate is America due mostly to immigrants having more kids than those born in America, but even that won't last fertility rates around the world are plummeting as standards of living improve your info is completely out of date, the world population will not get out of single digit billions before it starts dropping immigration will not save the west, when the rest of the world stops having kids too, many places already are, and everyone else is to follow if anything underpopulation will be the issue not overpopulation, given the current trends and likely future trends it's not hard to look up the fertility rates of countries and see the world population will be in decline soon enough you simply haven't done so, so you can continue to cling to your overpopulation myth it's not 1968 anymore, your views on world population growth are over 50 years out of date your boy Paul Ehrlich was wrong, get over it already
    1 point
  15. people aren't having enough kids for the population to get beyond 10 billion and that trend is accelerating, not reversing your understanding of population growth is vastly out of date your doomsday prophecies do not line up with the facts there will be no great culling
    1 point
  16. Firstly, we need to stop using words like “native” and “indigenous”. Science many years ago agreed that the Western Hemisphere was populated from north to south by way of immigration across the Bering Strait, then a land bridge. Human remains are oldest the further north and far predate Mayans or Inca. Thus, our so called “natives”, just as I am, are descendants of immigrants. Yet, as a Norwegian-American-Canadian, I don’t belong to a group which warrants a special Federal Cabinet position and gets billions a year. We’ve been accustomed to drilling our own water wells on farms and having fine drinking water in my family’s history. Canada is so messed up it’s probably best to start over.
    1 point
  17. At 61, single for 20 years with no children it’s a short list. I live comfortably retired early at 55 and have clear title on my home. I suppose my reasons are my cat, my motorcycle (43 riding) and the Utah desert south. The family has a winter home in Cocoa Beach, Florida and my sister has a winter place in El Centro, California on the desert. Covid has hurt as I can’t stand winter. Thank goodness for baseball and football.
    1 point
  18. The argument presented is one of an ethical claim. People have the right to their bodies. Yet your methodology is unethical, forced mandatory vaccinations, to which people do not have a right to their bodies. Both arguments counter-act the ethics of each action, nullifying the argument. It appears many unvaccinated individuals are concerned about the long term side effects of the vaccine. How can these concerns be mitigated? Force is unnecessary. Instead, maybe a guarantee that any negative results from the vaccine will be compensated by the corporation/government. Any future health issues will be mitigated by the corporation/government. The vaccinated are not unreasonable, nor are the unvaccinated, both have concerns for their own future. A middle ground understanding must occur before any positive action will occur.
    1 point
  19. He doesn't say it but he might as well. This government's fixation on 'equity' at the expensive of equality and merit is likely going to cause any number of issues down the road for Canada as we become more divided along identity lines. It's short-sighted, unjustified and stupid policies like this which the Left pushes so enthusiastically and so brainlessly which damage society more than anything conservatives can imagine doing. A lot was jarring about last spring’s record-setting federal budget, which the Senate approved last week. All the red ink aside, what caught my eye were repeated references to “equity-deserving” groups (though, its only economy, the budget didn’t use a hyphen). Thus in government procurement, there were to be “competitions open to businesses run by Canadians from equity deserving groups” in order to “help build a more inclusive economy” — by excluding businesses led by other groups. Similarly, the National Arts Centre receives $6 million over the next two years “to support collaborations with equity deserving groups to help relaunch the performing arts sector.” William Watson: With fairness for some? | Financial Post
    1 point
  20. Before you can implement a fix you need evidence there's a problem the fix can address. I have not seen any such evidence provided. With respect to most visible minority groups an unequal economic outcome between them and whites would seem to me to have been CAUSED by the government in the first place. That is, two thirds of visible minorities (as per census) are first generation immigrants and most of the remainder are their kids. Why would we presume that people immigrating from what used to be called third world countries would have the same economic outcomes as Canadians raised here? With respect to natives the problem, as Trudeau the Elder said long ago, was that they need to join society rather than sitting out in the boonies like living museum pieces. There's no jobs out there in most of those locations and never will be. So it doesn't matter what 'equity' you grant to natives they're always going to be behind the rest of society.
    1 point
  21. The free world is under siege while its citizens feast on lotus and fall asleep this is the way the world ends this is the way the world ends this is the way the world ends not with a bang, but a snore
    1 point
  22. quote Here is a timeline of COVID-19 cases in this country. Jan. 25: A man in his 50s who arrived in Toronto from Wuhan, China, the epicentre of the outbreak, becomes the first "presumptive" case of the new coronavirus in Canada. The man called 911 as soon as he got sick with relatively minor symptoms and was placed in isolation in Toronto's Sunnybrook Hospital. Jan. 26: The wife of the Toronto man who was Canada's first "presumptive" case of the new coronavirus becomes the second presumptive case. The woman is kept in home isolation. Jan. 27: The National Microbiology Lab in Winnipeg confirms that a man in quarantine in Sunnybrook Hospital is Canada's first documented case of the new coronavirus. Jan 28: Health authorities confirm Canada's second case of the novel coronavirus. The woman had recently travelled to Wuhan with her husband, who was the first case confirmed in Canada. Jan 28: Health officials in British Columbia say a man in his 40s is presumed to have the new coronavirus and is doing well as he recovers at his Vancouver home. B.C.'s health officer, Dr. Bonnie Henry, says the man often works in China and voluntarily isolated himself upon returning to Canada. Jan. 28: The presumed case of the new strain of coronavirus in B.C. is confirmed by the National Microbiology Laboratory in Winnipeg. Jan. 31: Toronto man hospitalized with the novel coronavirus is well enough to go home. Sunnybrook Hospital says he'll continue to recover at home, where his wife is also in self-isolation. Jan. 31: Ontario's third case of the new coronavirus is confirmed. The patient, a woman in her 20s, had travelled to the affected area in China. The London university student initially tested negative for the virus, but a subsequent test at the national lab in Winnipeg was positive. Health officials say her symptoms are minor. Canada's 1st 'presumptive' case of coronavirus found in Toronto 8 more cases of COVID-19 identified in B.C., including 1 of unknown origin Feb. 4: Health officials announce another presumptive confirmed case in B.C. Henry says the woman had family visiting from China's Hubei province and she is in isolation at her home. Feb. 5: British Columbia's second case of coronavirus is confirmed by the National Microbiology Lab. Feb. 6: Henry announces two new cases of COVID-19 in B.C., noting both people were in the same household as the woman diagnosed with the province's second case. Three of the four patients in Alberta are connected to the same Grand Princess cruise ship that docked Monday in Oakland, Calif. (Kate Munsch/Reuters) Feb. 12: Ontario health officials say the woman from London, Ont., no longer has the novel coronavirus in her system. It marks the first time a case of the illness has been resolved in Canada. Feb. 14: Officials in B.C. announce the province's fifth case of COVID-19. The woman in her 30s who lives in B.C.'s Interior recently returned from Hubei province. Feb. 19: Henry announces that the person diagnosed with B.C.'s first case of the new coronavirus has recovered. It's the first time this has happened in the province. Feb. 20: A woman who recently returned from Iran is diagnosed with British Columbia's sixth case of COVID-19. She's the first person in the country diagnosed with the illness who did not recently visit China. Meanwhile, in Ontario, the man who had Canada's first case of the virus is cleared after testing negative for the illness twice in 24 hours. Feb. 21: The last known case of coronavirus in Ontario is resolved. Canada's first COVID-19 death is not cause for panic — but shows need to protect most vulnerable Feb. 23: Officials in Toronto announce Ontario has a new case of coronavirus — the fourth to be diagnosed in the province. The woman arrived in Toronto from China several days earlier. unquote Timeline of COVID-19 cases across Canada | CBC News It is obvious from news reports the first cases were coming from China for weeks beginning January 25th, 2020. Trudeau refused to close the border to air travel from China. If Trudeau had closed the border to air travel from China and other countries, particularly countries known to have Covid, back in January, and closed the border to non-essential travel from the U.S., the entire picture in Canada might have been much different.
    1 point
  23. There are other examples of the growing Communism or totalitarianism with a Marxist bent. One is the BC NDP minister, possibly the AG, in Victoria saying he (or the government?) are thinking of lifting the driver's licences of people who don't pay their Covid fines or refusing to renew their driver's licences. This would be arbitrary coercion as driver's licences have nothing to do with paying or not paying Covid fines. Another example is when a BC NDP minister said they would take a school trustee to the Human Rights Tribunal for making unacceptable comments against Dr. Teresa Tam. We also know this same school trustee is opposed to the SOGI (sexual orientation and gender identity) curriculum in the B.C. schools education curriculum. This penchant to silence speech they don't condone is a Marxist trait. It's the kind of thing that would happen in North Korea or China. We also are seeing in the present enquiry into the B.C. Casino money laundering that high law enforcement officials and government cabinet ministers seemed to ignore or refused to take action for years when there was credible evidence or signs that large scale money laundering was going on for years. This was with the previous BC Liberal government in power. Corruption and authoritarianism seems to not be limited to one party although left wing and liberal parties will obviously be worse. We also just saw in the television news last night in BC that charges for murder against serious criminals are being dismissed by the court because the RCMP broke some serious laws meant to protect citizens rights, possibly under section 490 of the criminal code. It seems that is was standard policy to ignore these laws when investigating crime. It is yet to be seen how many murderers will be set free.
    1 point
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